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12. College of Natural Sciences

Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2008-2009 and 2009-2010; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Natural Sciences

Natural Sciences: NSC

Lower-Division Courses

001. First-Year Interest Group Seminar. Restricted to students in the First-Year Interest Group Program. Basic issues in various natural sciences disciplines. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

301C. Freshman Seminar. Restricted to first-semester freshmen. Small-group seminar involving reading, discussion, writing, and oral reports. Introduction to University resources, including libraries, computer and research facilities, and museums. Several sections are offered each semester, with various topics and instructors. Two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

001D. Practicum in Clinical Laboratory Science. Restricted to clinical laboratory science majors. Students participate in a twelve- to fifteen-month off-campus training program. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all organized coursework for the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science degree and consent of the program director.

302. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan: Critical Thinking Seminar. Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan or in the Gateway Program. An examination of fundamental concepts in critical thinking, including the role of intellectual virtues, an analysis of the elements of thought, Socratic thinking, and the application of universal intellectual standards. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 302 and Natural Sciences 302 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit.

109, 209, 309. Topics in Natural Sciences. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

110. Dean's Scholars Seminar. Restricted to students in the Dean's Scholars Program. Emphasis on student participation. Format may include student speakers, outside speakers, discussions, visits to laboratories, or other projects. The equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

311. Critical Reasoning. Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan program. An examination of the fundamental concepts in critical reasoning, including the analysis of argument, application of intellectual standards, and the role of intellectual virtues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged.

115. Women in Natural Sciences Seminar. The work and lives of women scientists in a sociocultural context. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

118C, 218C, 318C. Forum Seminar Series. Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Lectures and discussions on various contemporary issues. Emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives and critical discourse. For 118C, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 218C, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 318C, three lecture hours a week for one semester, or two lecture hours and one hour of supervised research a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

128C, 228C, 328C. Advanced Connexus Forum Seminar Series. Discussion of contemporary issues related to the topics of a Bridging Disciplines Program, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives, research, and critical discourse. For 128C, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 228C, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 328C, three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one hour of supervised research a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Additional prerequisites may vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

371. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan Seminar. Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan. An analysis of interdisciplinary themes within the arts and sciences through reading, research, discussion, and writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 371 and Natural Sciences 371 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan adviser.

Actuarial Foundations

See Department of Mathematics, page 567.

Department of Astronomy

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is published by the Office of Admissions.

Astronomy: AST

Lower-Division Courses

301 (TCCN: ASTR 1303). Introduction to Astronomy. General introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

101L. Astronomy Discovery Laboratory. For nonscience majors. Hands-on projects in observational astronomy and related laboratory disciplines. Students work in small groups. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Astronomy 103L. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Astronomy 301.

302. Self-Paced Introduction to Astronomy. General, self-paced introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

303. Introduction to Astronomy with Celestial Observations. General introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Introduces students to the night sky and includes some observational activities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

103L (TCCN: ASTR 1103). Astronomical Observations. For nonscience majors. Observations of the night sky with the naked eye and small telescopes; indoor laboratory activities. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Astronomy 101L, 302, or 303. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Astronomy 301 or 307.

104. Undergraduate Astronomy Seminar. Designed for astronomy majors. Discussions about current astronomical research, with different topics emphasized each semester. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated twice for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

307. Introductory Astronomy. Introduction to astronomy for science and engineering students. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307. Prerequisite: Mathematics 305G or the equivalent or consent of instructor; high school trigonometry and physics are recommended.

309 (TCCN: ASTR 1304). Topics in Astronomy for Nonscience Students. Selected topics in modern astronomy: solar system, galaxies, peculiar stars, cosmology, and others. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309L. Search for Extraterrestrial Life. For nonscience majors. Origin of life in the solar system, existence of other planetary systems, possibilities and techniques for detection of and communication with other intelligences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309N. Lives and Deaths of Stars. For nonscience majors. How stars live and die; extremes of stars and their life cycles. Exotic objects such as white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, and black holes. Specific topics may vary with instructor. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Astronomy 309N and 309Q may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309P. Astronomy in Science Fiction. The use of astronomy and other sciences in science fiction literature. Critical analysis of selected novels as to the validity of the astronomy used. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309Q. Time and the Cosmos. For nonscience majors. From the beginning of time in the Big Bang to the end of time in the black hole. Includes the early universe, the formation and evolution of single and double stars, and the supercompact objects they eventually become: white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Astronomy 309N and 309Q may not both be counted; Astronomy 309Q and 309R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309R. Galaxies, Quasars, and the Universe. For nonscience majors. Galaxies, quasars, giant black holes; cosmic evolution; the origin and future of the universe. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Astronomy 309Q and 309R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309S. The Solar System. For nonscience majors. The nature, origin, and evolution of our solar system, including planets, moons, and other bodies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309T. The Milky Way Galaxy. Our spiral system of stars, gas, and dust; star formation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

110K, 210K, 310K. Conference Course. Supervised study of selected areas of astronomy, by arrangement with a faculty member. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Astronomy. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Astronomy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Current Problems in Astronomy. For nonscience majors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

324. Origins: The Universe, Stars, Planets, and Life. For nonscience majors. Cosmic origins from the Big Bang to life, and the connections among the origins of stars, planets, and life. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Astronomy. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Astronomy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

350L. History and Philosophy of Astronomy. Historical influence of astronomical concepts on social, economic, literary, and scientific life; the place of astronomy in society. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

351. Astronomical Instrumentation. A hands-on course in computer-controlled optical instrumentation. Intended for natural science and engineering students interested in the practical aspects of instrument design and construction. Includes optics and optical design, electronics, machining and mechanical design, and computer interfacing. Students work in groups and as teams to design a computer-controlled optical instrument. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in the College of Natural Sciences or the Cockrell School of Engineering, or consent of instructor.

352K. Stellar Astronomy. Properties of stars and starlight: principles of radiation; interpretation of stellar spectra. Observational techniques such as photometry, spectroscopy, and telescopes and detectors; variable stars; binary stars. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

352L. Positional, Dynamical, and Kinematical Astronomy. Coordinate systems and time; stellar positions and motions; the kinematics and dynamics of star clusters and galaxies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 427K.

152M. Stellar Astronomy Laboratory. An introduction to practical observational techniques in astronomy, designed for astronomy majors or advanced students in a physical science. Exercises on the spectroscopy, photometry, and positions of stars using a sixteen-inch telescope on campus. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L; credit or registration for Astronomy 352K is recommended.

353. Astrophysics. Survey of the physics of stellar and nonstellar radiation laws, stellar atmospheres and interiors; high-energy astrophysics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

358. Galaxies and the Universe. Our galaxy and its constituents; stars and interstellar matter. Properties of other galaxies; galaxy interactions and mergers; expansion and evolution of the universe. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 316 or the equivalent; Astronomy 352K or 307 is recommended.

364. Solar System Astronomy. Modern studies of the solar system, including properties of the planets and smaller bodies, and the origin of planetary systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

367M. Methods of Astronomy. Same as Physical Science 367M. An introductory, self-paced course in the methods of astronomy that emphasizes learning astronomical principles through observations. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in astronomy. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and nine semester hours of coursework in mathematics and/or science, including one of the following: Physical Science 303, 304, Astronomy 301, 302, 303. Equivalent preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or earth sciences may be substituted with written approval of the instructor.

175, 275, 375. Conference Course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

376. Special Topics in Advanced Astronomy. Designed for science majors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Up to six semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts with a major in astronomy. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course. Research project and thesis for students electing to take the honors program in astronomy. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

School of Biological Sciences

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is published by the Office of Admissions.

Biology: BIO

Lower-Division Courses

101C, 301C, 401C, 601C. Topics in Biology. Topics in biology that are especially relevant to current issues and problems in modern society. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Some topics require one additional discussion hour or three or four additional laboratory hours a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward a degree in biology. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

301D. Biology for Business, Law, and Liberal Arts. Designed for nonscience majors. The scientific method and the social uses of scientific information. Topics include diet and chronic disease, radiation biology, DNA fingerprinting, the biology of learning, conservation of biotic diversity, and the biology of reproduction. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

301E. Problems in Modern Biology. An introduction to major concepts in biology, with emphasis on topics, such as genetics, that are relevant to current issues in the field. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 301E and 301L may not both be counted; Biology 301E and 301M may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in biology. Prerequisite: Admission to the Plan II Honors Program.

301L (TCCN: BIOL 1308). Molecules to Organisms. Designed for nonscience majors. Introduction to the structure and function of organisms from the molecular to the organ system level; an integrated approach to cell and molecular biology, genetics, development, and physiology of organisms. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301L, 302, 211, 311C; only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301L, 303, 311D, 214. Biology 301E and 301L may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

301M (TCCN: BIOL 1309). Ecology, Evolution, and Society. Designed for nonscience majors. Introduction to environmental adaptations, diversity of organisms, species interactions, organization and processes of communities, population growth and limitations, evolution and population genetics, origin of life, and human impact on the environment. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301M, 304, 311D, 213. Biology 301E and 301M may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

102C, 202C, 302C, 402C. Conference Course. Supervised study of selected topics in biology, by individual arrangement with the School of Biological Sciences and instructor. May be repeated for credit. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

305E. Plants, Environment, and Human Affairs. Designed for nonscience majors. Plants and the environment, including basic ecological principles and major issues such as global warming and the biodiversity crisis; plants and society, including foods, beverages, medicines, drugs, and other plant products. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

305F. An Introduction to the Sensory Physiology of Plants. Designed for nonscience majors. Exploration of the ways plants sense information about their environment and adapt their growth accordingly; similarities between plant and animal sensory physiology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

205L. Laboratory Experiments in Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology. Designed to give lower-division students training in laboratory techniques and experiment design and interpretation. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 205L and 309H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 311C (or credit for 211).

406D. Native Plants. Designed for nonscience majors. Introduction to the flora of central Texas. Involves plant identification, distribution, and consideration of edible and useful wild plants. Two lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester, including field trips. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

206L. Laboratory Experiments in Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms. The organizing principles of organismal biology, such as reproduction, development, homeostatic mechanisms, transport mechanisms, communication and effector systems, and adaptive biomechanics. Comparative study and an experimental rather than an observational context are emphasized. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 311D (or credit for 214).

307D. Biology of AIDS. Designed for nonscience majors. Introduction to organs, cells, genes, viruses, infectious diseases, and the immune system. Basic biology of HIV, AIDS, and epidemiology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology.

208L. Field Biology. Field projects, laboratory exercises, field trips, and computer simulation exercises to acquaint students with the principles and applications of ecology and some of the experimental and descriptive methods of ecological investigations. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 311D (or credit for 213).

309D. The Human Body. Designed for nonscience majors. Introduction to the systems of the body, their functions and interrelationships. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology. May not be taken for credit after or at the same time as another physiology course.

309F. Heredity, Evolution, and Society. Designed for nonscience majors. An elementary course in human genetics and its social impact. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 309E, 309F, 346. May not be counted toward a degree in biology. May not be taken for credit after or at the same time as another genetics course.

309H. Honors Laboratory Experiments in Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology. Training in laboratory techniques in cellular and molecular biology. The laboratory also emphasizes experimental design and data analysis. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 205L and 309H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 311C (or 211), and Chemistry 301 or 301H, with a grade of at least B in each, and consent of instructor.

311C (TCCN: BIOL 1306). Introductory Biology I. Introduction to biological energy transformation, cell structure and physiology, and gene expression. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301L, 302, 211, 311C. Biology 311C and 212 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 301, 301H, or 313N.

311D (TCCN: BIOL 1307). Introductory Biology II. Introduction to mechanisms of inheritance, evolution, physiology, and species interactions. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301L, 303, 311D, 214. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301M, 304, 311D, 213. Prerequisite: Biology 311C with a grade of at least C (or 211 and 212 with a grade of at least C in each).

315H. Advanced Introduction to Genetics: Honors. Restricted to biology and biochemistry majors. Basic principles of genetics and cell biology. Emphasis on gene structure and regulation; transmission of heritable traits; structure and function of cells; bacterial and viral genetics; and recombinant DNA technology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: A score of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in Biology and credit or registration for Chemistry 301 or 301H.

416K (TCCN: BIOL 2401). Physiology and Functional Anatomy I. Designed for prenursing and allied health students. Not recommended for premedical and predental students. Cell biology and histology; biochemistry; nervous, endocrine, and musculoskeletal systems. Taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory format. Three lecture hours, three laboratory hours, and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 311C (or 211) with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 301 or 313N with a grade of at least C.

416L (TCCN: BIOL 2402). Physiology and Functional Anatomy II. Designed for prenursing and allied health students. Not recommended for premedical and predental students. Cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, immune, and reproductive systems. Taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory format. Three lecture hours, three laboratory hours, and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 416K with a grade of at least C.

318M. Biostatistics. Introduction to methods of statistical analysis of biological data. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 318M and Statistics and Scientific Computation 318M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Four semester hours of coursework in biology and either Mathematics 408D or 408L.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Biology. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Biological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Cell Biology. Principles of eukaryotic cell structure and function; macromolecules, energetics, membranes, organelles, cytoskeleton, gene expression, signaling, division, differentiation, motility, and experimental methodologies. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 320 and 326E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

121C. Perspectives in General Microbiology. Reading and writing on microbial genetics and regulation. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

121E. Perspectives in General Microbiology. Adjunct to Biology 226T: additional reading and writing on microbial cell structure and genetics. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 226T.

321L. Aquatic Entomology. The taxonomy of aquatic insects; the use of aquatic insects in biomonitoring. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 321L, 370C (Topic: Applied Aquatic Entomology), 384K (Topic 13: Aquatic Entomology). Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

322. Structure, Physiology, and Reproduction of Seed Plants. The principles of structure and functioning of higher plants; special attention to the dynamics of growth and development and reproduction. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 302 or 302H, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 122L.

122L. Structure, Physiology, and Reproduction of Seed Plants Laboratory. Observation of structure and reproduction in seed plants and employment of experimental techniques that demonstrate physiological processes, especially processes of growth and development. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology 322.

323L. Laboratory Studies in Cell Biology. Research exercises involving light/electron microscopy, image processing, autoradiography, chromatography, fractionation, flow cytometry, spectroscopy, diffraction, antibody labeling, cell growth, and kinetics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Biology 320.

324. Survey of the Plant Kingdom. Review of the groups of living and fossil plants, emphasizing their organization, reproduction, and evolution. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 124L.

124L. Survey of the Plant Kingdom Laboratory. Demonstration of members of various plant groups, using cultures and prepared materials, to emphasize organization, reproduction, and evolution. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology 324.

325. Genetics. Basic principles of Mendelism, molecular genetics, structure and function of genes and chromosomes, populations and evolution. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 325 and 325H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 311C (or 211) and 311D (or 214), with a grade of at least C in each.

325H. Genetics: Honors. Basic principles of genetics and evolution. Emphasis on population genetics and natural selection; structure and function of organ systems; behavioral ecology; and mutational analysis of organismal development. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 325 and 325H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 315H with a grade of at least C.

325L. Laboratory Experience in Genetics. Experimentation and direct observation in fundamental aspects of transmission genetics. One lecture hour, four laboratory hours, and two hours of computing work a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

325T. Human Genetics. Human genetic variation, medical genetics, segregation and pedigree analysis, and population genetics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

126L. General Microbiology Laboratory. Introduction to microbiology laboratory techniques and experimental demonstration of principles of microbiology. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For nursing majors, credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 226N; for others, credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 326R (or 226R).

326M. Introductory Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Designed primarily for prepharmacy students. Overview of the structure, function, and genetics of bacteria, viruses, and fungi, with emphasis on the interactions between micro-organisms and the human host. Includes principles of microbial pathogenesis, the host's innate and adaptive immune responses to infection, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, and antimicrobial chemotherapy and vaccines. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

226N. General Microbiology: Immunity and Host-Microbe Interactions. For nursing majors. Basic characteristics of microorganisms; infection and immunity. Two lecture hours and one enrichment/discussion hour a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 311C with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 301 or 313N with a grade of at least C.

326R. General Microbiology. Overview of the major areas of microbiological study, including cell structure and function, genetics, host-microbe interactions, physiology, ecology, diversity, and virology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C.

327. General Phycology. A general survey of the algae and of their biology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 327 and 388J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 324, 124L, and 325 or 325H, with a grade of at least C in each, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 127L.

127L. Laboratory in General Phycology. Survey of various algal groups, including direct observations of their biology, exposure to research techniques, and instruction in culture procedures. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 327.

328. Introductory Plant Physiology. General principles of the mineral nutrition, water relations, metabolic activities, growth and development of green plants. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 302 or 302H.

328D. Discovery Laboratory in Plant Biology. Learning methods of experimental design, data gathering, data interpretation, and data presentation, including original experiments relating to questions of current interest in plant physiology. Five lab hours a week for one semester. Biology 328D and 337 (Topic: Discovery Laboratory in Plant Biology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

128L. Laboratory Experiments in Plant Physiology. Introduction to experimental techniques used in the study of the mineral nutrition, water relations, metabolic activities, growth and development of green plants. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 328.

329. Medical Mycology. A basic introduction to medical mycology and an overview of research involving both the fungal zoopathogen and its host. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

129L. Medical Mycology Laboratory. Basic techniques for the identification and manipulation of fungi of medical importance. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 126L (or 341) with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 329.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Biology. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the student abroad adviser in the School of Biological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Biological Sciences. This course covers the work period of biological sciences students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Application through the College of Natural Sciences Career Services Office; and Biology 325 or 325H, and six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in biology, with a grade of at least B in each.

330. Animal Virology. Mechanisms by which viruses replicate and kill or transform cells. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

230L. Virology Laboratory. Basic experimental techniques applied to selected bacteriophages and animal viruses. Four laboratory hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and 126L with a grade of at least C in each, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 330 or 333.

331L. Laboratory Studies in Molecular Biology. The methods and principles of molecular biology in a research laboratory context. Students conduct a research project directed by a faculty member. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 126L; and Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

332. Yeast Cell Biology. Yeast is used as a model to teach some of the more actively researched areas of cell biology, such as chromosome structure, mating type, cell-cell interaction, DNA replication, mitosis, cytoskeletal motors, cell polarity, signal transduction, cell cycle, checkpoints, secretion, protein modification, yeast genetics, and yeast technology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

333. Molecular Genetics of Bacteriophages and Plasmids. Mechanisms of the phage infection cycle and of plasmid replication and gene expression; transposons and transposition. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

335. Introduction to Biochemical Engineering. Microorganisms in chemical and biochemical synthesis; genetic manipulation of cells by classical and recombinant DNA techniques. Enzyme technology; design of bioreactors and microbial fermentations; separations of biological products. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 335, Biomedical Engineering 339, Chemical Engineering 339, 379 (Topic: Introduction to Biochemical Engineering). Prerequisite: Biology 311C with a grade of at least C, and either Chemistry 339K and 339L, or 369.

336. Tumor Biology. Natural history and causal mechanisms of cancer; viral and chemical carcinogens. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 336 and 391M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 330 or 360K with a grade of at least C.

137, 237, 337, 437. Selected Topics in Biology. Recent developments and research methods in the biological sciences. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Some topics may require additional hours; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

  • Topic 1: Senior Seminar in Human Biology. Restricted to human biology majors in their final semester. This topic is offered as 137 only. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Additional prerequisite: Biology 346 with a grade of at least C.

337J. Computational Biology. Overview of computational biology, with emphasis on nucleic acid sequence analysis and databases. Class projects and self-learning exercises. Two lecture hours and three computer laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and 344 with a grade of at least C in each.

438L. Animal Communication. Animal communication from a multidisciplinary perspective, with emphasis on quantitative analysis, sensory processing, and evolution of signals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, with computer laboratory hours as required. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 359K or 370 with a grade of at least C.

339. Metabolism and Biochemistry of Microorganisms. A study of the metabolic processes of microorganisms, using a biochemical approach. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 339 and 391R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each, and Chemistry 310M and 310N (or 610).

339M. Bacterial Signal Transduction. Advanced studies in molecular and cellular biology of signal transduction systems in diverse microorganisms. Topics include chemotaxis and motility, morphogenesis and development, and secretion and virulence. Taught entirely through reading and discussion of original articles. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

340L. Biology of Birds. Anatomy, physiology, classification, and ecology of birds. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

342L. Field Ornithology. Field course with emphasis on field study techniques, species identification by sight and sound, mist netting and banding, censusing techniques, and territory mapping. Two lecture hours and six hours of weekend fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 340L.

343M. Transmembrane Signaling Mechanisms. Mechanisms by which hormones, light, and other stimuli trigger changes in plant and animal cell metabolism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 343M and 388C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and Chemistry 339K with a grade of at least C in each.

344. Molecular Biology. Molecular basis of cellular processes: biochemistry of cellular metabolism; gene structure and function; DNA replication; RNA and protein synthesis; viruses; molecular aspects of immunology and cancer; recombinant DNA. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 326D and 344 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

345. Cell Physiology. An integrated approach to basic processes in physiology: metabolism, transport, energetics, molecular and cellular control mechanisms. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 310M.

345E. Endocrinology. Vertebrate endocrinology (primarily mammalian), with a focus on human pathophysiology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 337 (Topic: Endocrinology) and 345E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

346. Human Biology. Introduction to human evolution, genetics, sexuality, senescence, and population growth. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 309E, 309F, 346. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

347. Biology and Genetics of Immune Disorders. Immune disorders in mammals, including humans, used as models for examining basic immunological and immunogenetic principles; emphasis on immune disorders of vertebrates. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

148, 248, 348. Training Cruise(s): Research in Biological Oceanography. Biology 148 and 348 are same as Marine Science 148 and 348 (Topic 1: Research in Biological Oceanography). One or more cruises of one to several days each to collect physical, chemical, oceanographic, and biological data relevant to biological processes in the sea. Preparatory instruction and postcruise sample processing and analysis. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Biology 325 and Chemistry 302 with a grade of at least C in each, and consent of instructor.

448L. Invertebrate Biology. A study of the interdependent structure and function and of the evolution of invertebrate animals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

349. Developmental Biology. Principles of animal development, with emphasis on developmental mechanisms. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

349L. Experiments in Animal Developmental Biology. Methods and principles of developmental biology in a laboratory context, with emphasis on animal embryology using molecular techniques and microscopy. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 349.

350M. Plant Molecular Biology. Fundamentals of plant molecular biology, including structure and expression of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 350M and 388M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

351. Economic Botany. An in-depth analysis of the origin of domesticated plant species, the role in nature of plant products, and the ways natural products have been altered through artificial selection. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

352. Reproductive Biology of Flowering Plants. Pollination biology, breeding systems, reproductive strategies, and fruit and seed dispersal from evolutionary and ecological vantage points. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

353F. Field Entomology. A field course on insects, with emphasis on field study techniques, visual identification of species, collecting techniques, and curation in the field. Meets five days a week for one hour a day during a summer-session term; additional fieldwork to be arranged, including extended field trips. Biology 353F and Biology 337 (Topic: Field Entomology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

453L. Entomology. Characteristics, importance, and biology of the major groups of insects. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, with additional fieldwork hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

354L. Ichthyology. Overview of the evolution, biology, and ecology of fishes, emphasizing freshwater fishes. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory or fieldwork a week for one semester, with field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

455L. Vertebrate Natural History. Phylogeny, taxonomy, life histories, habits, and distribution. Two lecture hours and three hours of laboratory or fieldwork a week for one semester, with field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

456L. Limnology and Oceanography. Same as Marine Science 440. Introduction to the study of the interactions between aquatic organisms and their environments. Two lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 302 or 302H.

357. Evolutionary Ecology. Principles of modern ecology, particularly as they relate to natural selection and evolutionary theory. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

458L. Systematics. Comparative study of biological variation of living and fossil organisms, including speciation, biogeography, taxonomy, and phylogeny of genes, populations, species, and higher taxa. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

359. Global Environmental Change. Global change as it affects terrestrial ecosystems, including feedback between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases and global warming, ozone, biological invasions, and land-use change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 322 or 324 with a grade of at least C.

359J. Behavioral Ecology. Advanced topics in behavioral ecology, with detailed consideration of animal communication, altruism, sexual selection, plant-animal interactions. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 359K or 370 with a grade of at least C.

359K. Principles of Animal Behavior. An introduction to the study of animal behavior: descriptive analysis of behavior; physiological basis of behavior; development of behavior; adaptive significance and evolution of behavior; communication and social behavior. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

359R. Animal Sexuality. The biology of sexuality, including genetics, morphology, physiology, and psychology of sex. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

360K. Immunology. The basic concepts of humoral and cell-associated immune phenomena. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

160L. Immunology Laboratory. Current techniques in experimental cellular and humoral immunology. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 360K.

361. Human Infectious Diseases. Etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and immunobiology of the major microbial diseases, with emphasis on their prevention. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

361L. Public Health Bacteriology Laboratory. Training in techniques required for independent work in diagnostic and epidemiological bacteriology. Two lecture hours and five laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

361P. Public Health Internship. Students conduct goal-oriented research projects at the Texas Department of State Health Services and other sites. An average of twelve hours of fieldwork a week for a total of 180 hours of fieldwork for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Biology 126L and 326R, with a grade of at least B in each; students must also complete an application available at the Natural Sciences Career Services office.

361T. Comparative Animal Physiology. Physiology of organ systems in animal phyla, with special emphasis on physiological adaptations of organisms to their environment. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

262. Plant Systematics. Elementary principles of plant taxonomy as exemplified by families of flowering plants found seasonally around Austin. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 262L.

262L. Angiosperm Diversity Laboratory. Practical experience in recognizing, identifying, and classifying families of flowering plants. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 262.

363. Plant Speciation. Nature of species in higher plants, speciation phenomena in plants, natural hybridization, polyploidy, agamospermy, evolutionary mechanisms. Lectures, readings, discussions, demonstrations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 363 and 387E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

364. Microbial Ecology. The ability of microbes to adapt to and change their environment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

364E. Current Topics in Advanced Microbial Ecology. Development and structure of microbial communities, microbial phylogeny, endosymbiont and symbiont relationships, biogeochemistry, elemental cycling by microbes, and the microbial ecology of disease. Emphasis on active research areas in these topics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and 364 with a grade of at least C in each.

365D. Principles of Drug Action. Introduction to the basic principles of pharmacology, including how drugs get into the body, exert their actions, and are metabolized and excreted. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 337 (Topic: Principles of Drug Action) and 365D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

365L. Neurobiology Laboratory. An introduction to physiological, morphological, and molecular techniques used for analysis of the nervous system. Experiments and computer simulations illustrate basics of information processing by the nervous system. Student exercises are supplemented with demonstrations in faculty laboratories. Four laboratory hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 205L, 206L, 309H, or 126L with a grade of at least C; Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C; and Biology 365R or 371M with a grade of at least C.

465M. Experimental Methods in Physiology. A lecture-laboratory course that emphasizes an experimental approach to physiological problems. One lecture hour and seven laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 345, 361T, 365R, or 371M with a grade of at least C.

365N. Development and Plasticity of the Nervous System. An introduction to the principles by which the neural tube (brain and spinal cord) develops during embryogenesis, including regionalization of the brain into forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord. Particular emphasis will be given to the mechanisms that govern how neurons acquire their identity and form neuronal circuits and synapses. Developmental and congenital diseases and possible therapies, including stem cell based therapy or gene therapy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 349 with a grade of at least C, and Biology 365R or 371M with a grade of at least C.

365R. Vertebrate Physiology I. Vertebrate systems physiology: basic cellular physiology, nervous and muscular systems. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 365R and 371M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

365S. Vertebrate Physiology II. Vertebrate systems physiology: body fluids, cardiovascular system, respiration, digestion, metabolism, and endocrinology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

365T. Neurobiology of Disease. The neurobiological basis of disorders of the brain, with the main focus on mental illness. Emphasizes the neural circuitries and neurochemical events that underlie specific mental processes and behaviors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 365R or 371M with a grade of at least C.

365W. Neurobiology of Addiction. Study of the neurobiology of neurotransmitters, and the influence of alcohol and drugs of abuse on neurotransmitters. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 365R or 371M with a grade of at least C.

366. Microbial Genetics. Molecular biology of nucleic acids; biosynthesis of macromolecules, transfer of genetic material from cell to cell, recombination, mutagenesis, and regulatory mechanisms. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 366 and 391S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 126L and 326R (or 226R) with a grade of at least C in each.

366R. Molecular Genetics. Recommended for students planning to pursue advanced degrees in experimental and biochemical genetics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

367. Plant Genetics. Genes, gene systems, linkage systems, and genetic systems in higher plants. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 367 and 387C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

368L. Techniques in Molecular Genetics. Laboratory experience in mutagenesis, transformation, transduction, isolation of plasmid and bacteriophage DNA, in vitro recombinant DNA procedures, and DNA base sequencing. One lecture hour and seven laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 368L and 390P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and 126L with a grade of at least C in each.

369L. Herpetology. Biology of amphibians and reptiles, including evolution, ecology, behavior, physiology, life history, and field identification. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, with weekend field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 455L, 357, 359K, or 478L with a grade of at least C.

370. Evolution. Introduction to modern evolutionary biology, focusing on the evolution of molecular, developmental, morphological, and behavioral traits. Genetic and ecological bases of evolutionary changes within populations and of evolutionary divergence in animals and plants. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 370 and 385K (Topic 2: Evolution) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

170C, 270C, 370C, 470C. Conference Course. Supervised study of selected topics in biology, by individual arrangement with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

471G. Natural History Museum Science. An introduction to curatorial practices in natural history museums. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester; students also complete a twenty- to thirty-hour curatorial project. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

371L. Experimental Physiology. Experimental approach to physiological mechanisms by which animals adapt to their environment. One lecture hour, four laboratory hours, and two hours of computer work a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 126L with a grade of at least C; and Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

371M. Neuronal Basis of Brain and Behavior. The nervous system, with emphasis on vertebrate neurobiology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 365R and 371M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

472L. Taxonomic Plant Anatomy. An advanced course emphasizing those aspects of plant anatomy that are most reliable and useful for systematic purposes. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 472L and 487G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 374 and 174L with a grade of at least C in each.

373. Ecology. An introduction to ecology, the study of relationships among organisms and between organisms and their environment; adaptations, population, communities, and ecosystems. Includes both plants and animals and both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

373L. Ecology Laboratory. Intensive field ecology. Includes group field experiment and observation, independent projects, and field trips to other vegetation zones. Students complete weekly write-ups of observation and data analysis, reports of independent projects, and an oral presentation on an independent project. Four laboratory hours and two workshop/lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 373.

374. Plant Anatomy with Histological Techniques. Tissue organization and cellular details of stems, roots, and leaves of seed plants, with emphasis on development and function. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and concurrent enrollment in Biology 174L.

174L. Laboratory in Plant Anatomy and Histological Techniques. Demonstration of cellular details and tissue systems of plant organs; instruction in the preparation of plant materials for histological examination. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 374.

375. Conservation Biology. Application of principles of ecology to the preservation of wild plant and animal species and to the preservation, management, and restoration of natural and seminatural ecosystems. Emphasis on scientific, biological aspects of issues such as endangered species protection, preserve design, and forest management. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and Biology 357, 359J, or 373 with a grade of at least C.

376. Conservation Genetics. Genetic attributes of rare plant and animal species, especially as they affect conservation; germ plasm resource conservation in wild and domesticated species. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 376 and 385C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

177, 277, 377. Undergraduate Research. Laboratory or field research in the various fields of biological science under the supervision of one or more faculty members. May be repeated for credit. Up to three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C, and written consent of instructor.

478L. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Study of vertebrate morphology from developmental anatomy to the function, biomechanics, and phylogenetic relationships of living and fossil taxa. Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 478L and Kinesiology 324K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C.

478T. Natural Resource Management. Land management, policy and regulation development, and ecological "footprint" evaluation. Students have the opportunity for practical application of these subjects through off-campus field projects. Three lecture hours and two hours of discussion or fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C; and one of the following courses or consent of instructor: Biology 351, 357, 373, 375, Geography 334, 346.

379G. Advanced Mammalian Genetics. Molecular developmental genetics and review of classical genetics. Possible topics include but are not limited to cancer, AIDS, forensic genetics, genomics, and gene therapy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least B.

379H, 679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Original laboratory or field research project under the direction of a faculty mentor, leading to a thesis or research presentation for students in the honors program in biology. The equivalent of three or six lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than six hours may be counted toward a degree in biology. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

379J. Regulation of Eukaryotic Gene Expression. Enrollment is limited to upper-division undergraduates. Study of gene expression and its regulation in eukaryotes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Includes transcription, RNA splicing, polyadenylation, RNA and RNA-protein interactions. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C; and Chemistry 339K and 339L, or Chemistry 369.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Students seeking the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, or Bachelor of Science in Physics must take the University of Texas at Austin Test for Credit in Chemistry 301 if they were admitted to the University with high school credit in chemistry. Engineering majors in areas other than chemical engineering are encouraged to take the test. Students with three semesters or more of high school chemistry that included laboratory experience, or credit for Chemistry 301, are encouraged to take the University of Texas at Austin Test for Credit in Chemistry 302. These tests are offered only in Austin. Information about them is available from the Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment.

Each student planning to register for a chemistry course should consult an adviser in his or her major area to determine whether specific courses are required.

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is published by the Office of Admissions.

Biochemistry: BCH

Lower-Division Course

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Biochemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Course

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Biochemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Chemistry: CH

Lower-Division Courses

301 (TCCN: CHEM 1311). Principles of Chemistry I. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Some sections also require one enrichment/discussion hour a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 301 and 301H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for one of the following: Mathematics 408C, 408D, 408K, 408L, 408M, 427L.

301H. Principles of Chemistry I: Honors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 301 and 301H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K, and consent of the departmental honors adviser.

302 (TCCN: CHEM 1312). Principles of Chemistry II. Development and application of concepts, theories, and laws underlying chemistry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Some sections also require one enrichment/discussion hour a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 302 and 302H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 301H with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for one of the following: Mathematics 408C, 408D, 408K, 408L, 408M, 427L.

302H. Principles of Chemistry II: Honors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 302 and 302H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 301H with a grade of at least C, Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C, and consent of the departmental honors adviser.

303. Mathematical Introduction to Theories of Matter. Introduction to the quantum theoretic description of atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei, elementary particles, and cosmology. Matrix mechanics and group theory. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 303 may be used instead of either Chemistry 302 or Chemistry 301 and 302 in fulfilling the prerequisites of other chemistry courses, except by students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree. Chemistry 303 may be counted in addition to Chemistry 301 and 302. Not recommended by the Health Professions Office for Medical College Admission Test preparation.

204 (TCCN: CHEM 1111). Introduction to Chemical Practice. Introductory laboratory course in chemistry. Four laboratory hours and one hour of discussion a week for one semester. Some sections may also require one hour of computer laboratory a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 204 and 317 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 302.

304K. Chemistry in Context I. Designed for nonscience majors. Chemistry 304K and 305 form a two-semester sequence designed to fulfill the science requirement for students not majoring in science or engineering. Issues of contemporary interest and importance, such as ozone depletion and global warming, motivate the discussion; the underlying chemistry is developed as needed. Social, political, economic, and ethical implications of scientific developments and science policy are considered. Chemistry 304K addresses the nature of matter, energy, chemical reactions, and chemical thermodynamics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any chemistry or biochemistry degree. May not be counted by students who have earned a grade of C or better in Chemistry 301. Not intended as preparation for Chemistry 301.

305. Chemistry in Context II. Designed for nonscience majors Chemistry 304K and 305 form a two-semester sequence designed to fulfill the science requirement for students not majoring in science or engineering. Chemistry 305 addresses nuclear reactions, alternative energy sources, elementary organic chemistry, polymers, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and genetics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any chemistry or biochemistry degree. May not be counted by students who have earned a grade of C or better in Chemistry 302. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 304K.

206K. Undergraduate Research. Introduction to research practices; supervised individual undergraduate research in chemistry. Six to ten laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than four semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Hours beyond four must be taken on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of the undergraduate adviser in chemistry.

107, 207. Conference Course. Supervised study in chemistry. One discussion hour a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May not be counted toward a major or minor in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

207K. Introduction to Science Outreach in Elementary Schools. Students develop and present level-appropriate science laboratories to students in local elementary schools. A hands-on, discovery learning approach to science is emphasized. One class hour and four hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be counted as an elective only. Prerequisite: Consent of the UTeach adviser in the College of Natural Sciences.

207L. Peer Teaching. Students act as peer teaching assistants in other University chemistry courses, mainly large general chemistry lecture sections. Two hours of lecture and training a week for one semester, and two to three hours a week leading student group discussions. May not be counted toward any degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 and consent of the coordinator of the Peer Teaching Assistant Program.

108, 208, 308, 408. Topics in Chemistry. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward a major or minor in chemistry or biochemistry.

210C. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and five laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310N (or credit for 610B).

110K (TCCN: CHEM 2123). Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 210C. Chemistry 110K and 118K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and 204 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310M (or credit for 610A).

110L (TCCN: CHEM 2125). Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, 110K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310N (or credit for 610B).

310M (TCCN: CHEM 2323). Organic Chemistry I. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. The development of organic chemical structure, nomenclature, and reactivity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610A, 310M, 618A, 318M. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 204 or 317.

310N (TCCN: CHEM 2325). Organic Chemistry II. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. The development of organic chemical reactivity, with a focus on carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610B, 310N, 618B, 318N. Prerequisite: Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 210C.

313N. General and Organic Chemistry. Recommended for human ecology and nursing students. Introduction to chemical principles and organic chemistry, with emphasis on compounds of biological importance. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 610, 618, or an equivalent organic chemistry course. May not be counted toward any chemistry degree.

113P. General and Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 304K or 313N.

314N. Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. A one-semester biochemistry course for human ecology and nursing students. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 339K. May not be counted toward any chemistry degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry 313N, or Chemistry 310M (or 610A), 310N (or 610B), 110K, and 110L.

114P. Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory. Introduction to biochemical laboratory procedures. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 113P and credit or registration for Chemistry 314N.

317. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry for Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors. Synthesis and properties of inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic compounds. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 204 and 317 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 302.

118K. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 210C. Chemistry 110K and 118K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 318M (or credit for 618A).

118L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 318M (or 618A) with a grade of at least C, 118K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 318N (or credit for 618B).

318M. Organic Chemistry I. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The development of organic chemical structure, nomenclature, and reactivity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610A, 310M, 618A, 318M. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 118K.

318N. Organic Chemistry II. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The development of organic chemical reactivity, with an emphasis on synthesis and polymers. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610B, 310N, 618B, 318N. Prerequisite: Chemistry 318M (or 618A) with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 118K with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 118L.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Chemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Chemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Chemistry/Biochemistry. This course covers the work period of chemistry and biochemistry students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310N (or 610B) or 318N (or 618B) with a grade of at least C, application to become a member of the Cooperative Chemistry/Biochemistry Program, and consent of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry undergraduate adviser.

431. Inorganic Chemistry. Survey of the chemistry of the elements, incorporating both descriptive and theoretical aspects. Open-ended experiments designed to illustrate a variety of synthetic techniques. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302, and either Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C.

339K. Biochemistry I. Chemistry 339K and 339L should be taken as a two-semester sequence. Students who do not plan to take Chemistry 339L should register for Chemistry 369 rather than 339K. Structure and function of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 339K and 369 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M (or 610A) or Chemistry 318M (or 618A) with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 310N (or 610B) or Chemistry 318N (or 618B) with a grade of at least C.

339L. Biochemistry II. A second-semester biochemistry course designed for chemistry, premedical, predental, and life sciences majors. Biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K with a grade of at least C.

341. Special Topics in Laboratory Chemistry. Examples of topics are physical measurements techniques; electronics for scientists; advanced synthetic chemistry (organic or inorganic); separation techniques. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

644. Chemical Education: Secondary School. Issues and techniques in secondary school teaching of chemical sciences. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: For 644A, eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry and credit or registration for Chemistry 144K; for 644B, Chemistry 644A, 144K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 144L.

144K. Chemical Education Laboratory I. Development of classroom demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and teaching aids for secondary school teaching of the chemical sciences. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 644A.

144L. Chemical Education Laboratory II. Development of classroom demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and teaching aids for secondary school teaching of the chemical sciences. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 644B.

353. Physical Chemistry I. For chemistry and chemical engineering majors. Equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, ideal and nonideal solutions, phase equilibria, thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 353 and 353M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C; and Physics 316 and 116L, 303L and 103N, or 317L and 117N.

153K. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

353M. Physical Chemistry I for Life Sciences. For biochemistry and biology majors. Thermochemistry and kinetics of reactions in cells, enzyme catalysis, electrical and transport properties of membranes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 353 and 353M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C; and Physics 316 and 116L, 303L and 103N, or 317L and 117N.

354. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy. Fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, exactly soluble model problems, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, spectroscopy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; and Physics 316 and 116L.

154K. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 354 or 354L.

354L. Physical Chemistry II. Molecular energy levels, statistical thermodynamics (macroscopic thermodynamic functions from molecular input), and physical and chemical kinetics, with emphasis on the molecular viewpoint. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward a biochemistry or chemistry degree. Chemistry 354, rather than this course, is recommended for students planning graduate study in chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

455. Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry. For biochemistry, engineering, and clinical laboratory science majors. Chemical and instrumental methods in analytical chemistry. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 455 and 456 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either 204 or 317, with a grade of at least C in each.

456. Analytical Chemistry. For chemistry majors. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 455 and 456 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C.

367L. Macromolecular Chemistry. Designed for chemistry and chemical engineering students. Occurrence, preparation, structure, and properties of macromolecular substances. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M and 310N (or 610A and 610B) or Chemistry 318M and 318N (or 618A and 618B); Chemistry 210C, or 118K and 118L; and Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

368. Advanced Topics in Chemistry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: 310M and 310N (or 610A and 610B) or Chemistry 318M and 318N (or 618A and 618B); Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C; and Chemistry 354 or 354L with a grade of at least C.

369. Fundamentals of Biochemistry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 339K and 369 may not both be counted. May not be counted by biochemistry majors. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M (or 610A) or 318M (or 618A).

369K. Techniques of Research. Advanced laboratory practice and introduction to research. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. May be taken for a letter grade no more than twice. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry; and six semester hours of upper-division chemistry courses approved by the undergraduate adviser's office, or consent of the undergraduate adviser in chemistry.

369L. Biochemistry Laboratory. An introduction to modern fundamental techniques of biochemistry. Two lecture hours and seven laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K and credit or registration for 339L.

369T. Biotechnology Laboratory. Advanced techniques in biotechnology. Nine laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

370. Physical Methods for Biochemistry. Theory of electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and diffraction as applied to biological macromolecules. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K.

371K. Science Outreach in Elementary Schools. Students develop and present level-appropriate science laboratories to students in local elementary schools. Students also plan and create the infrastructure needed to administer the science program in concert with the science curriculum at a specific elementary school. A hands-on, discovery learning approach to science is emphasized. One class hour and six hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. May be taken for a letter grade no more than twice. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, at least six hours of upper-division coursework in the College of Natural Sciences, and consent of the UTeach adviser in the College of Natural Sciences.

375K, 475K. Individual Study in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Supervised reading or individual tutorial sessions on advanced topics in chemistry and biochemistry. Three or four class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry, Chemistry 353, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

376K. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 and 456 with a grade of at least C in each.

379H. Chemistry Honors Tutorial Course. Laboratory research project in a specific field of chemistry under the supervision of one or more faculty members. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Must be taken in addition to the required hours for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree. Students must enter no later than the first semester of the year of graduation. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

Undergraduate Catalog, 2008-2010

page 4 of 6 in Chapter 12

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