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4. Red McCombs School of Business

  • Thomas W. Gilligan, PhD, Dean[1]
  • Janet M. Dukerich, PhD, Senior Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
  • Paula C. Murray, JD, Associate Dean, Undergraduate Program
  • Arthur T. Allert, BA, BSEd, Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program
  • Lise G.Burson, BA, Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program

General Information

Objectives

The undergraduate program of the Red McCombs School of Business seeks to transform the lives of its students through a well-rounded professional education. The challenging curriculum is designed to provide a balanced perspective of business disciplines and a foundation for the lifelong development of an appreciation of the social, technological, and global economic forces shaping the future; the ability to recognize and promote ethical behavior; interpersonal and leadership skills; and the quantitative and analytical skills necessary for professional progress and advanced study.

History and Facilities

The School of Business Administration was created in 1922, the outgrowth of the work in business administration first offered in the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall of 1912. In 1945, the school was reorganized as a college; in 2000, the college was renamed in honor of University alumnus and benefactor Red McCombs. The degree of Bachelor of Business Administration was first offered in 1916-1917. The Bureau of Business Research, organized in 1926 as one of the Extramural Divisions of the University, became the research division of the school in September, 1945. In addition to the Bureau of Business Research, the school includes the Departments of Accounting; Finance; Information, Risk, and Operations Management; Management; and Marketing. Coursework in business may lead to the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration and to several advanced business degrees, described in the Graduate Catalog.

The McCombs School is housed in the George Kozmetsky Center for Business Education. This three-building complex includes modern classrooms and offices, lecture rooms with sophisticated multimedia equipment, and conference and study rooms, as well as lounges for informal student and teacher interaction. Computer and computer-access facilities are also available to students, faculty members, and staff members.

Financial Assistance Available through the School

Students who are enrolled in the McCombs School of Business are eligible for scholarships and awards funded by industry, foundations, and individuals. Some of these awards are available school-wide, while others are restricted to students in one department. Since funds are limited, students selected to receive an award must demonstrate outstanding academic aptitude and a firm commitment to a business education.

Most scholarships for continuing students are reserved for students who have declared a business major. Generally, seventy to eighty school scholarships are awarded annually, in amounts of $500 to $2,500; some are renewable. Criteria for awarding scholarships vary to meet the wishes of the donors but often include financial need, academic performance, major area of study, and hometown. Descriptions of school scholarships and applications for them are available on the Undergraduate Programs Office Web site in March of each year. The deadline for submission is the end of May for scholarships for the following academic year. Recipients are selected by the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee of the school and are usually notified during the summer.

Departmental scholarships are generally reserved for juniors and seniors majoring in a program of the department. Because departmental scholarships are normally funded by annual contributions, the number of scholarships and the amounts awarded vary among departments and over time. Criteria for departmental awards are specified by the donors and include the same kinds of characteristics as those established for school-wide awards; deadlines and other elements of the selection process also vary among departments. Interested students should contact the major department for further information.

Student Services and Academic Advising

The Undergraduate Programs Office provides administrative support and student services for the school. Student services include maintenance of student academic records, academic counseling by appointment, development of official degree audits for students, and graduation certification.

In addition, every undergraduate student enrolled in the McCombs School of Business is assigned to a professional academic adviser. Academic advisers in the Undergraduate Programs Office are available to assist all students with questions about scholastic progress, degree requirements, rules and regulations, and other available campus services such as career and personal counseling. Faculty advisers are also available in each department to help students explore their educational and career goals.

Self-Advising

Although all students are encouraged to meet regularly with their assigned advisers, those who have been enrolled in the McCombs School of Business for at least one semester are permitted to self-advise and therefore to register without consulting an academic adviser. To be eligible to self-advise, the student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.00. Like all other students, those who self-advise are responsible for knowing the requirements of the degree program they have chosen, for enrolling in courses appropriate to that degree program, for meeting the prerequisites of the courses selected, and for taking courses in the proper sequence to ensure orderly and timely progress toward the degree.

BBA Career Services

BBA Career Services offers job search assistance to business students and alumni. The purpose of the office is to help students determine their career goals, develop a plan for achieving these goals, and select and obtain employment commensurate with their goals, interests, and training. To help students prepare for their career search, the office presents workshops on rsum writing, interviewing, conducting a job search, evaluating offers, and other career interest areas.

In addition to the career-related workshops, the BBA Career Advising team also teaches the required courses Business Administration 101S and 101T to freshmen and transfer students. The purpose of these courses is to assist business students with planning, implementing, and evaluating their careers. These courses are designed to provide students with the foundations for executing a successful job search and focus on career management as a lifelong process. After completing these courses, students can implement job search strategies and interviewing techniques in pursuing internship and full-time employment opportunities.

Most students obtain their internship, which is a required part of the undergraduate business curriculum, at the end of their junior year. However, BBA Career Services encourages freshmen and sophomores to attend its recruiting activities and events, which can help them obtain various internships prior to the required internship. These experiences can help students develop their rsums and job search skills.

The office maintains a career resource library of company literature, videos, employment information, and general business publications for students' use. About fourteen thousand individual interviews for internships and full-time opportunities are arranged annually with employers in business, industry, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Several hundred firms conduct on-campus interviews at the McCombs School each year.

To assist employers, the office provides rsum searches among graduating seniors seeking full-time positions and among juniors seeking internships; these are sent to organizations nationwide that request them. The office also coordinates about three hundred receptions and information sessions each year.

Another resource for employers, students, and alumni is the online McCombs Job Board. The Job Board helps recruiters reach business alumni and current students. It complements the on-campus recruiting program by allowing companies to recruit candidates for a wide variety of roles in their organizations throughout the calendar year.

More information about BBA Career Services is provided by the McCombs School.

As a complement to the assistance available from the school, the Career Exploration Center provides comprehensive career services to all University students. The center offers professional assistance to students in choosing or changing their majors or careers, seeking an internship, and planning for the job search or for graduate study.

The University makes no promise to secure employment for each graduate, but rather provides the tools and resources to ensure that students have access to employment opportunities.

Student Organizations

Student organizations play a vital role in the educational experience offered by the University. Students who become involved in organizations gain experience in leadership, teamwork, networking, time management, and other practical areas. This experience, when combined with the theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom, helps students develop a well-rounded set of skills for use academically, professionally, and personally.

The Undergraduate Business Council (UBC) is the governing student body in the school. It comprises representatives from each McCombs affiliated student organization, an executive board, representatives elected by the student body, and members appointed by the executive board. The UBC acts as a representative of all undergraduate business students and sponsors such programs as Parents' Day and the VIP Lecture Series.

Business student organizations sponsor professional activities such as guest lectures, field trips, and faculty "fireside chats"; many offer social activities as well. McCombs affiliated student organizations are American Marketing Association, Asian Business Students Association, International Association of Students in Economics and Commerce (AIESEC), Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA), Alpha Kappa Psi (professional business fraternity for men and women), BBA Energy Finance, Beta Alpha Psi, Black Business Student Association, Business and Healthcare Association, Business Transfer Student Association, Delta Sigma Pi, Engineering Route to Business Leadership Council, Freshman Business Association, Honors Business Association, Hispanic Business Students Association, Management Information Systems Association, McCombs Diversity Council, National Association of Black Accountants, Net Impact, Phi Beta Chi (professional business fraternity for men and women), Phi Chi Theta (professional business fraternity for men and women), Student Consulting Initiative, Return on Investment (Christians in Business), Tech Connects, University Accounting Association, University Finance Association, and University Investors Association.

Admission and Registration

Requirements for Admission to the McCombs School of Business

Admission and readmission of undergraduate students to the University is the responsibility of the University director of admissions. Information about admission to the University is given in General Information.

Each year there are more qualified applicants to the McCombs School than can adequately be instructed by the faculty or accommodated within existing facilities. To provide students with the best educational experience possible, the school must limit undergraduate admission. Therefore, admission to the school is extremely competitive and admission requirements are more stringent than those of the University. As a result, a student may be admitted to the University but denied admission to the school. The student must be admitted to the school to pursue a degree program described in this chapter.

Admission to the school is granted for the fall semester only. Admitted students are expected to attend Orientation the summer before they enter the school.

Freshman Admission Requirements for Texas Residents

To be considered for admission to the school, Texas-resident high school students must be granted regular admission to the University. However, because enrollment is limited by the availability of instructional resources, admission requirements for business degree programs are more restrictive than those of the University. High school rank and SAT Reasoning Test or American College Testing Program (ACT) scores are among the factors used in making admission decisions. Students may be placed in a deferred decision category until they submit additional information. A student who is admitted to the University but denied admission to the school may seek admission to another academic program at the University.

Freshman Admission Requirements for Nonresidents

Because of enrollment restrictions dictated by the availability of faculty and facilities in the school and limitations on nonresident enrollment imposed by the Board of Regents, nonresident applicants are considered individually.

Application Procedures for Freshman Admission

Students may apply for admission through the Office of Admissions Web site, http://bealonghorn.utexas.edu. To be considered for admission to the McCombs School of Business, the student should specify business as his or her intended major. All application materials must be submitted to the Office of Admissions by the deadline to apply for admission to the University for the fall semester; this date is given in General Information.

Students in Other Divisions of the University

Students enrolled in other degree programs at the University who wish to enter a degree program described in this chapter must submit an application for a change of major to the Undergraduate Programs Office by the end of May to be considered for admission in the following fall semester. The following minimum requirements for consideration are in addition to the requirements to transfer from one division to another that are given in General Information.

  1. Completion of twenty-four semester hours of coursework in residence on the letter-grade basis by the end of the preceding spring semester.
  2. Completion of Mathematics 408K, 408C, or the equivalent.
  3. A passing score on the Computer Proficiency Test.
  4. Completion of at least one of the following courses: Mathematics 408L or 408D, Economics 304K, 304L.
  5. Students who have sixty hours or more of college credit must have completed the following courses: Mathematics 408K or 408C, 408L or 408D, Economics 304K, 304L.
  6. Completion of the foreign language proficiency requirement of two years of a single foreign language in high school or one year of a single foreign language in college.

Admission is granted on a space-available basis and may not be possible if instructional resources are not compatible with enrollment demands. A student with a grade point average of less than 3.30 is unlikely to be admitted to the school.

Transfer Admission

A student seeking to transfer to the McCombs School of Business from another university should list business as his or her intended major on the admission application. Because students are not admitted to the school for the spring or summer, application materials must be submitted to the Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline for the student to be considered for admission in the following fall semester. The following minimum requirements for consideration are in addition to the requirements for transfer admission that are given in General Information.

  1. Completion of Mathematics 408K, 408C, or the equivalent, and Management Information Systems 310 or the equivalent.[2]
  2. Completion of at least one of the following courses: Mathematics 408L, 408D, or the equivalent; Economics 304K; 304L.
  3. Students who have sixty hours or more of college credit must have completed the following courses: Mathematics 408K or 408C, Mathematics 408L or 408D or the equivalent, Economics 304K and 304L, and Management Information Systems 310 or the equivalent.[2]
  4. Completion of the foreign language proficiency requirement of two years of a single foreign language in high school or one year of a single foreign language in college.
  5. A grade point average of at least 3.00 on transferable college credit.

Because of enrollment restrictions dictated by the availability of faculty and facilities in the school and limitations on nonresident enrollment imposed by the Board of Regents, an applicant may be denied admission to the McCombs School even though he or she meets University transfer requirements. Such an applicant may seek admission to another academic program at the University. A student with a grade point average of less than 3.30 is unlikely to be admitted to the McCombs School.

Claiming a Major

Each student is admitted to the McCombs School as an unspecified major. The student may claim a specific business major when he or she has completed thirty semester hours of coursework, including Business Administration 101H, 101S, or 101T, Economics 304K and 304L, Mathematics 408K or 408C, and Mathematics 408L or 408D; has registered with BBA Career Services; and has fulfilled the foreign language requirement for the BBA degree. All students are required to claim a major before completing seventy-five semester hours. Students may claim their majors online. A student seeking admission to the integrated MPA or the Business Honors Program must complete a separate application; requirements for admission to these programs are given in this chapter later.

Admission with Deficiencies

Students who were admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information. Credit used to remove a deficiency may not be counted toward the degree. It may be earned on the pass/fail basis. Students may not claim a major until high school unit deficiencies have been removed.

Foreign Language Proficiency

Each student must provide evidence that he or she has fulfilled the foreign language proficiency requirement for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Students may not claim a major until the foreign language proficiency requirement has been met.

Admission-to-Major Requirements for Students Previously Enrolled in the School

A former student who was most recently enrolled in the McCombs School of Business and who is readmitted to the University reenters the major in which he or she was last enrolled. However, a former business student who has earned a BBA degree at the University is readmitted with the classification "degree holder but nondegree seeker."

A former student who was most recently classified as a prebusiness student or an unspecified business student will be readmitted to the transitional student classification. The student may then apply for admission to a business major according to the procedures given in the section "Students in Other Divisions of the University."

Registration

General Information gives information about registration, adding and dropping courses, transfer from one division of the University to another, and auditing a course. The Course Schedule, published before registration each semester and summer session, includes registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and instructors of classes. The Course Schedule and General Information are published on the registrar's Web site. The printed General Information is sold at campus-area bookstores.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Computer Proficiency Requirement

Business students must demonstrate computer competency by passing the Computer Proficiency Test before they enroll in courses for which the test is a prerequisite. Information about test dates is published by the Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment. Transfer students should consult their academic advisers before taking the test.

Honors

Business Honors Program

The Business Honors Program is available to outstanding students who have distinguished themselves inside the classroom and out by superior performance during high school or in their first year at the University.

University Honors

The designation University Honors, awarded at the end of each long-session semester, gives official recognition and commendation to students whose grades for the semester indicate distinguished academic accomplishment. Both the quality and the quantity of work done are considered. Criteria for University Honors are given in chapter 1.

Graduation with University Honors

Students who, upon graduation, have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement are eligible to graduate with University Honors. Criteria for graduation with University Honors are given in chapter 1.

Beta Gamma Sigma

The Alpha of Texas chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholastic honor society in the field of business and administration, was chartered in 1922. Membership, based on outstanding scholarship, is restricted to the top 7 percent of the junior class, top 10 percent of the senior class, and top 20 percent of graduate students. The objectives of Beta Gamma Sigma are "to encourage and reward scholarship and accomplishment among students of business and administration, to promote the advancement of education in the art and science of business, and to foster integrity in the conduct of business operations."

The Minor

While a minor is not required as part of the BBA degree program, the student may choose to complete a minor in either a second business field or a field outside the school. A student may complete only one minor. The minor consists of at least twelve semester hours in a single field, including at least nine hours of upper-division coursework.[3] Six of the required hours must be completed in residence. A course used to fulfill the requirements of a minor may not be taken on the pass/fail basis unless the course is offered only on that basis. Only one business core course or one course counted toward the Bachelor of Business Administration degree requirements may also be counted toward the minor. The internship course may not be counted toward the minor.

The McCombs School allows the student to minor in any field in which the University offers a major. However, prerequisites and other enrollment restrictions may prevent the student from minoring in some fields. Before planning to take specific courses to fulfill the minor requirement, the student should consult the department that offers those courses.

The Customer Insight Concentration

The concentration in customer insight is a multiarea specialization for BBA students who want to explore how technology is changing customer relationships and to develop expertise in responding to new technological imperatives. The concentration includes courses in supply chain management, new product development, organizational change, data communication and management, and customer relationships. Emphasis is on contemporary business problems and the knowledge of hands-on solutions that students need to cross the traditional boundaries among job functions. Students gain exposure to prospective employers through research projects based on real-world business problems.

The student must fulfill the following requirements. Courses required for the concentration may also be counted toward major and minor requirements.

  1. A major in marketing or management information systems.
  2. Fifteen semester hours of coursework, consisting of Marketing 372, Management Information Systems 325, one approved management information systems or management elective, and two approved marketing electives. A list of approved electives is available from the student's academic adviser.

The Business Foundations Program

The Business Foundations Program (BFP) is designed to provide a foundation in business concepts and practice for students in other majors. Any nonbusiness student with a University grade point average of at least 2.00 may take any BFP courses for which he or she meets the prerequisite. No admission process is required.

Nonbusiness students who wish to build a business course concentration may request certification in the BFP. Students who complete the following certification requirements in either the general track or the global track and submit a request to the BFP director receive a certificate and a letter verifying completion of the program.

Business Foundations Certification Requirements

General Track

The certification requirements are

  1. The following prerequisite courses:

    1. Economics 304K or 304L or the equivalent.
    2. An introductory statistics course chosen from the list of approved courses available in the advising office.
  2. The following courses, completed in residence:

    1. Accounting 310F; or both Accounting 311 and 312.
    2. Management Information Systems 302F; or Statistics 309 and either Management Information Systems 301 or 310.
  3. Finance 320F.
  4. Three of the following four courses: International Business 320F, Legal Environment of Business 320F, Management 320F, Marketing 320F.
  5. Two of the four courses taken to fulfill requirements 3 and 4 above, with the exception of Legal Environment of Business 320F, may be taken in an approved study abroad program. A list of approved programs is available in the business Undergraduate Programs Office.
  6. The student must complete the courses used to fulfill requirements 1 through 5 on the letter-grade basis. He or she must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in these courses.
  7. The student must complete at least two long-session semesters in residence.

Global Track
The certification requirements are

  1. The following prerequisite courses:

    1. Economics 304K or 304L or the equivalent.
    2. An introductory statistics course chosen from the list of approved courses available in the advising office.
  2. Proficiency in a modern foreign language, demonstrated by earning nine semester hours of credit beyond course 507 or the equivalent in the language. Three of these hours must be in an upper-division course in grammar and composition.
  3. Completion of at least one semester in an approved study abroad program. A list of approved programs is available in the business Undergraduate Programs Office.
  4. The following courses, completed in residence:

    1. Accounting 310F; or both Accounting 311 and 312.
    2. Management Information Systems 302F; or Statistics 309 and either Management Information Systems 301 or 310.
  5. International Business 320F. This course must be completed in an approved study abroad program. A list of approved programs is available in the business Undergraduate Programs Office.
  6. Finance 320F.
  7. Two of the following three courses: Legal Environment of Business 320F, Management 320F, Marketing 320F.
  8. Two of the three courses taken to fulfill requirements 6 and 7 above, with the exception of Legal Environment of Business 320F, may be taken in an approved study abroad program. A list of approved programs is available in the business Undergraduate Programs Office.
  9. The student must complete the courses listed in requirements 1, 4, 5, 6, and 7 on the letter-grade basis. He or she must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in these courses.
  10. The student must complete at least two long-session semesters in residence.

Graduation

Special Requirements of the McCombs School of Business

All students must fulfill the general requirements for graduation. Business students must also fulfill the following requirements.

  1. All University students must have a grade point average of at least 2.00 to graduate. Business students must also have a grade point average in business courses of at least 2.00. Students in the Business Honors Program must have a University grade point average and a grade point average in business courses of at least 3.25. Students in the integrated MPA program must have a grade point average of at least 3.00 in all coursework taken as part of the minimum thirty-six-hour graduate program; they must also have a grade point average of at least 3.00 in graduate accounting coursework.
  2. The University requires that at least six semester hours of advanced coursework in the major field of study be completed in residence. For additional requirements, see "BBA Degree Requirements."
  3. A candidate for a degree must be registered in the McCombs School of Business either in residence or in absentia the semester or summer session the degree is to be awarded and must apply to the dean for the degree no later than the date specified in the official academic calendar.

The Degree Audit and Graduation Application

The student may request a degree audit in the Undergraduate Programs Office when he or she enters a business major. The degree audit is prepared by comparing the degree requirements of the student's major with the student's University record, including transferred work. It shows the coursework required for the major, the courses completed that fulfill requirements, the hours of designated coursework that are still needed, grade point averages, and the residency requirements that have been fulfilled. In preparing the degree audit, every effort is made to avoid errors, but it is the student's responsibility to be aware of and to fulfill all graduation requirements.

A degree candidate must apply for the degree no later than the date given in the official academic calendar. No degree will be conferred unless the diploma application form has been properly filed. The graduation application is available online.

Degrees

Degree requirements are listed below in "BBA Degree Requirements" and "Program Degree Requirements." For a complete list of requirements for a degree, the student should combine the requirements in these two sections with the University-wide graduation requirements and the McCombs School graduation requirements.

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses are offered by the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. They may not be counted toward the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. However, they are counted among courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

No more than twelve semester hours of air force science, military science, or naval science coursework may be counted toward the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. ROTC courses may be used only as nonbusiness electives and may be counted toward the degree only by students who complete the third and fourth years of the ROTC program and accept a commission in the service.

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

A business student may count toward the degree up to four one-semester courses in elective subjects outside the major taken on the pass/fail basis; only electives, nonbusiness electives, and upper-division nonbusiness electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Credit earned by examination is not counted toward the total of four courses that the student may take pass/fail.

If a student decides to major in a subject in which he or she has taken a course on the pass/fail basis, it is generally the prerogative of the major department to decide whether the course will be counted toward degree requirements; in the McCombs School of Business, such courses may not be counted toward the major. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Students planning to take correspondence or extension courses should consult with the Undergraduate Programs Office before doing so to ensure compliance with the following restrictions.

  1. Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere will not be counted toward a business degree unless it is specifically approved in advance by the dean. A student may not be enrolled concurrently for correspondence courses from the University or for correspondence or extension courses from another institution during his or her last semester.
  2. Correspondence instruction in the required business core courses may not be counted toward the degree unless specifically approved in advance by the dean.
  3. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree may be completed by correspondence, extension, or a combination of the two methods.
  4. With regard to registration on the pass/fail basis, correspondence and extension courses are subject to the same restrictions as courses taken in residence; these restrictions are given in the section "Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis."

Concurrent Enrollment

A student must have the approval of the dean before registering concurrently at another institution, either for resident coursework or for a distance education course, and before enrolling in correspondence or extension coursework at the University. A student may not be enrolled concurrently during his or her last semester in any course to be counted toward the degree.

Core Curriculum

All students must complete the University's core curriculum, described in chapter 2, and the following specific requirements for the BBA, including the requirements of a major. In some cases, a course that is required for the BBA or for a major may also be counted toward the core curriculum; these courses are identified below.

BBA Degree Requirements

  1. A grade point average of at least 2.00 is required on all work undertaken at the University for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded. In addition, a grade point average of at least 2.00 in business courses is required.

    The official grade in a course is the last one made; however, if a student repeats a course and has two or more grades, all grades and all semester hours are used to calculate the University grade point average and to determine the student's scholastic eligibility to remain in the University and his or her academic standing in the McCombs School of Business.

    A student may not repeat for credit or grade points any course in which he or she has earned a grade of C or higher (or the symbol CR, if the course was taken on the pass/fail basis).

  2. A candidate for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree must be enrolled in the McCombs School in the semester or summer session in which the degree is awarded.
  3. Each student is expected to complete the courses required for his or her major and to meet the curriculum requirements described in items 4 through 7 below in the year specified.
  4. During their freshman and sophomore years, students must complete the University's core curriculum, described in chapter 2.
  5. Students must complete the following BBA degree requirements during the freshman year:

    1. Mathematics 408K and 408L, or 408C and 408D, or the equivalent. This coursework also meets the core curriculum mathematics requirement and part II of the core curriculum natural science requirement.
    2. Economics 304K and 304L. Economics 304K also meets the core curriculum social science requirement.
    3. Management Information Systems 301.
    4. Three hours of coursework in anthropology, psychology, or sociology, chosen from approved courses; courses dealing primarily with statistics or data processing may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
    5. One of the following:

      1. Three additional hours of coursework in anthropology, psychology, or sociology, chosen from the list of courses that may be counted toward requirement 5d above.
      2. Three additional hours of coursework in fine arts, chosen from the courses that may be counted toward the core curriculum visual and performing arts requirement.
      3. Three hours of upper-division coursework completed in an approved study abroad program. A list of approved programs is available in the Undergraduate Programs Office.
    6. Business Administration 101H, 101S, or 101T. Entering freshmen take Business Administration 101S, entering transfer students take Business Administration 101T, and entering business honors students take Business Administration 101H. Because each course is offered only once a year, failure to take the course in the proper semester will prevent the student from declaring a major and progressing toward the degree.
  6. Students must complete the following BBA degree requirements during the sophomore year:

    1. Accounting 311 and 312.
    2. Statistics 309.
    3. Three hours of coursework in public speaking, with an emphasis (at least 50 percent of the course content) on the preparation and presentation of professional speeches, using computer technology when appropriate.
    4. Business Administration 324.
  7. Eighteen semester hours beyond the first two years are specified as follows:[4]

    1. Legal Environment of Business 323.
    2. Finance 357.
    3. Marketing 337.
    4. Operations Management 335 or Management 336.
    5. A professional, business-related internship or practicum course chosen from the following: Accounting 353J, 366P, Business Administration 353H, Finance 353, 366P, Management 353, 366P, Management Information Systems 353, 366P, Marketing 353, 366P, Operations Management 353, 366P. Only one internship course may be counted toward the degree.
    6. Statistics 371G.
  8. The following requirements apply in addition to those in items 4 through 7 above:

    1. Additional coursework to provide a total of at least sixty semester hours outside the McCombs School. At least six of these hours must be at the upper-division level. Students should consult the requirements of their major department for additional information about coursework to be taken outside the school.
    2. Completion of the requirements of one of the majors listed in the section "Program Degree Requirements." In no event is a degree of Bachelor of Business Administration awarded to a student with fewer than forty-eight semester hours in business, at least twenty-four of which have been completed in residence on the letter-grade basis at the University. At least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in the major must be completed in residence at the University on the letter-grade basis.[5] For additional residence requirements, see the general requirements for graduation in chapter 1.

  9. Proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by the completion of the first two semesters taught at the University. This requirement may be fulfilled either by completion of the two high school units in a single foreign language that are required for admission to the University as a freshman or by the demonstration of proficiency at the second-semester level. Credit earned at the college level to achieve the proficiency may not be counted toward the degree. It may be earned on the pass/fail basis.
  10. Any two courses with a substantial writing component or a writing flag; one of these courses must be upper-division. Courses that fulfill this requirement are identified in the Course Schedule. They must be taken on the letter-grade basis. They may be used simultaneously to fulfill other requirements.

Program Degree Requirements

Accounting

Two programs are available to students who wish to study accounting at the University. The first is the four-year major in accounting leading to the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. The second is the five-year integrated approach to the Master in Professional Accounting degree, which leads to the simultaneous award of the BBA and the Master in Professional Accounting degrees. The objective of the BBA accounting curriculum is to provide students with a broad overall education, solid grounding in the common body of knowledge of business administration, and exposure to accounting in sufficient depth to help them achieve entry-level competence for pursuit of a career in industry. The integrated approach is designed for students who wish to concentrate in accounting and obtain education in an accounting specialization.

Bachelor of Business Administration

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. Twenty-one semester hours of accounting: Accounting 311, 312, 326, 327, 329, 362, and 364.
  3. Economics 420K.
  4. Operations Management 335 and Management 336 and 374.
  5. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 121 semester hours.

BBA/MPA: Integrated Approach

The integrated approach to the Master in Professional Accounting is a five-year program of undergraduate and graduate coursework that allows the student to earn the BBA and the Master in Professional Accounting (MPA) degrees at the same time. The professional curriculum, which usually begins in the student's junior year, includes specially designed accounting courses taught in relatively small classes by full-time faculty members.

The accounting faculty has designed three concentrations within this program: auditing/financial reporting, managerial accounting/control, and taxation. Each concentration is a sequence of courses that offers strong preparation for a particular career path. In addition, the student may choose a generalist curriculum.

Because MPA graduates are expected to become leaders in the accounting profession, highly motivated students with the personal qualities and intellectual capacity to establish successful careers in public accounting, industry, not-for-profit organizations, and higher education are encouraged to apply.

Admission

Students are admitted to the integrated approach according to the following requirements. Admission is granted only for the fall semester; June 1 is the application deadline for those who wish to begin the program the following fall. Students interested in this program must have met the following requirements by the June 1 deadline: the foreign language requirement for the BBA degree; and completion of at least sixty semester hours of coursework, including Accounting 311 and 312, Business Administration 101H, 101S, or 101T, Economics 304K and 304L, Mathematics 408K or 408C, and Mathematics 408L or 408D.

Admission is based on the applicant's University grade point average and SAT Reasoning Test or ACT scores, as well as other relevant examples of academic ability and leadership. An applicant with a University grade point average of less than 3.00 is unlikely to be admitted to this program. Admission may be restricted by the availability of instructional resources. Application materials and information about deadlines are published by the McCombs School.

Before beginning the fifth year, integrated approach students must be admitted to the MPA program. Students must complete at least two long-session semesters in residence in the MPA program. Application forms must be submitted by February 1 of the student's fourth year. Students must have completed the following BBA degree requirements before the application deadline: Rhetoric and Writing 306, English 316K, and three hours of coursework in public speaking. They must also earn an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and have their test scores sent to the University's Office of Admissions. Students usually take the GMAT in the fall or winter of their fourth year.

Satisfactory Progress

Students are expected to make continuous progress toward the degree by completing required accounting coursework each semester. Students who fail to take required accounting coursework two long-session semesters in a row will be removed from the program and placed in the unspecified business major. Students will be notified before this action is taken; they must meet with their academic adviser upon being notified.

Probation

A student is placed on probation if his or her grade point average in core undergraduate accounting courses falls below 3.00. Except with the consent of the MPA Program Office, a student on probation may not take graduate accounting courses.

Dismissal

The student is dismissed from the integrated approach if (1) he or she fails to improve his or her academic performance significantly while on probation, or (2) he or she will not achieve a grade point average of 3.00 even by earning grades of A in all remaining core undergraduate accounting courses.

Graduation

To receive an MPA degree, a student must have a grade point average of at least 3.00 in all coursework taken as part of the minimum thirty-six-hour MPA degree. He or she must also have a grade point average in graduate accounting coursework of at least 3.00.

Degree Requirements

The requirements of this program are

  1. Undergraduate coursework

    1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above. Because the integrated approach includes a graduate-level internship course, students may forgo the undergraduate internship course described in requirement 7e of the BBA degree requirements.
    2. Economics 420K.
    3. Operations Management 335 and Management 336 and 374.
    4. The following courses: Accounting 152 or 153, 254, 355, 356, 358C, and 359.
    5. For students in the auditing/financial reporting, managerial accounting/control, or generalist concentration, Finance 367 and a business elective; for students in the taxation concentration, Finance 367 and three semester hours of coursework in legal environment of business approved by the student's academic adviser.
    6. Additional elective work, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 121 semester hours of undergraduate coursework.
  2. Graduate coursework

    1. Accounting 380K (Topic 1: Financial Accounting Standards and Analysis I) and 380K (Topic 13: Information Technology for Accounting and Control).
    2. Thirty additional semester hours of graduate coursework, including at least twelve hours in accounting and no more than six hours outside business. The student's academic adviser must approve coursework in the student's concentration in advance.

Business Honors Program

The Business Honors Program is designed to provide an intellectual challenge for students who have distinguished themselves academically and in leadership roles outside the classroom. The student may choose a general program of study or one of the major programs in business or both. Business Honors Program students take twelve business courses in special sections open only to them. At least two and one-half years are required to complete the Business Honors Program sequence of courses. Additional information is available from the Business Honors Program Office.

Admission

Admission to the Business Honors Program is limited to a small number of exceptional students who are chosen on a competitive basis. Admission decisions are made by the Business Honors Program Committee. Most students enter the program as freshmen, but some are admitted as sophomores.

Students entering the University and the McCombs School of Business as freshmen may apply to the Business Honors Program by completing a separate application form available from the Business Honors Program Office. The Business Honors Program Committee considers the student's SAT Reasoning Test or ACT scores, high school class rank, preparatory courses, extracurricular activities, evidence of leadership ability, and other objective criteria.

Students may also seek admission to the Business Honors Program during the spring semester of their freshman year. To be considered for admission, the student must have completed in the fall and spring semesters of the freshman year at least twenty-four semester hours of college-level coursework; coursework must include Economics 304K and 304L, Mathematics 408K or 408C, and Mathematics 408L or 408D. The student must also have fulfilled the foreign language requirement for the BBA degree. In addition to the criteria for freshman applicants in the preceding paragraph, the Business Honors Program Committee considers the student's grade point average in courses taken in residence at the University and the number, type, and rigor of the courses the student has taken at the University. No student will be admitted to the Business Honors Program who has received credit for Management Information Systems 301 and more than one of the other business core courses listed as degree requirements below in a regular (nonhonors) section.

Application materials and information about deadlines are published by the McCombs School.

Continuance

A student who enters the Business Honors Program as a freshman must have a grade point average of at least 3.50 on the courses taken in residence during the fall and spring semesters of the first year to continue in the program. The student must complete at least twelve semester hours in residence on the letter-grade basis during each of those two semesters. After the freshman year, each student, whether admitted as a freshman or as a sophomore, is dismissed from the program if his or her overall or business grade point average drops below 3.25. Exceptions are granted only by the Business Honors Program Committee.

Graduation

To graduate under the Business Honors Program, the student must earn a University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average of at least 3.25 in business courses.

Degree Requirements

Business Honors Program students may choose a general program of study, one of the major subject degree plans, or both. Requirements for the general program of study are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. Completion of the following business core courses and other business courses in special Honors Program sections: Accounting 311H, 312H, Business Administration 324H and 151H, Finance 357H, Legal Environment of Business 323H, Management 336H and 374H, Management Information Systems 301, Marketing 337H, Operations Management 335H, and Statistics 309H and 371H.
  3. Nine semester hours of upper-division business electives.
  4. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 121 semester hours.

Engineering Route to the BBA

The program of study for the engineering route to the BBA provides a sound foundation in mathematics, in science, and in business, qualifying the student for more advanced study in the management of technological, engineering, and scientific enterprises. In addition to specific required business and engineering courses, the program contains two block options. Students choose an engineering block option consisting of four courses and a business block option consisting of three courses. The block option program is designed to help students develop greater competence in particular aspects of engineering and business. Students are advised in the Department of Information, Risk, and Operations Management.

All students must take the courses listed below, with a minimum of forty-eight semester hours in the McCombs School of Business. In addition, a block option may include courses that have prerequisite courses that are not part of the engineering route degree requirements. Students should plan their schedules carefully to ensure that the prerequisites of all block option courses are met. Prerequisites for all courses are given in this catalog. Other requirements of the Cockrell School of Engineering must also be fulfilled.

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above, with the following modifications:

    1. Students in this program must complete Mathematics 408C and 408D or Mathematics 408K, 408L, and 408M.
    2. Operations Management 335 is required as the upper-division business core course in management.
  2. The following business courses: Operations Management 337 (Topic 5: Project Management) and Management 374.
  3. The following nonbusiness courses: Chemistry 301, Mechanical Engineering 210, and Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N. The physics sequence also meets part I of the core curriculum natural science requirement.
  4. Mathematics 427K or Philosophy 313K.
  5. Twelve semester hours of coursework, at least six of which must be upper-division, chosen from one of the engineering block options below.
  6. Nine semester hours of coursework, at least six of which must be upper-division, chosen from one of the business block options below.
  7. A three-semester-hour business elective.
  8. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 124 semester hours.

Engineering Block Options

Biomedical Engineering

  • BME 301, World Health and Biotechnology
  • BME 314, Engineering Foundations of Biomedical Engineering
  • BME 221, Measurement and Instrumentation Laboratory; and 251, Biomedical Image, Signal, and
  • Transport Process Laboratory
  • BME 348, Modeling of Biomedical Engineering Systems
  • BME 353, Transport Phenomena in Living Systems

Chemical Engineering

  • CHE 317, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis
  • CHE 322, Thermodynamics
  • CHE 348, Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering and Problem Solving
  • CHE 350, Chemical Engineering Materials
  • CHE 353, Transport Phenomena

Computer Engineering

  • C S 307, Foundations of Computer Science
  • C S 315, Algorithms and Data Structures
  • C S 336, Analysis of Programs
  • E E 306, Introduction to Computing
  • E E 312, Introduction to Programming; or C S 310, Computer Organization and Programming
  • E E 313, Linear Systems and Signals
  • E E 316, Digital Logic Design
  • E E 319K, Introduction to Microcontrollers
  • E E 360C, Algorithms
  • E E 360F, Software Engineering Processes
  • E E 360N, Computer Architecture

Electrical Engineering

  • E E 302, Introduction to Electrical Engineering
  • E E 411, Circuit Theory
  • E E 313, Linear Systems and Signals
  • E E 331, Electrical Circuits, Electronics, and Machinery
  • E E 438, Electronic Circuits I
  • E E 339, Solid-State Electronic Devices

Mechanical Systems

  • E M 306, Statics
  • M E 311, Materials Engineering
  • M E 320, Applied Thermodynamics
  • M E 326, Thermodynamics
  • M E 330, Fluid Mechanics
  • M E 338, Machine Elements
  • M E 365L, Industrial Design for Production
  • M E 368J, Computer-Aided Design

Operations Engineering

  • M E 218, Engineering Computational Methods
  • M E 366L, Operations Research Models
  • M E 367S, Simulation Modeling
  • M E 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering
  • M E 375K, Production Engineering Management

Business Block Options

Accounting/Finance

  • ACC 326, Financial Accounting -- Intermediate
  • ACC 327, Financial Statement Analysis
  • ACC 329, Managerial Accounting and Control
  • ACC 362, Auditing and Control
  • ACC 364, Fundamentals of Taxation
  • FIN 367, Investment Management
  • FIN 370, Integrative Finance
  • FIN 371M, Money and Capital Markets
  • FIN 374C, Financial Planning and Policy for Large Corporations
  • FIN 374S, Entrepreneurial Finance
  • FIN 376, International Finance
  • FIN 377, Advanced Investment Analysis

Management Information Systems

  • MIS 304, Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming
  • MIS 325, Introduction to Data Management
  • MIS 333K, Web Application Development
  • MIS 373, Topics in Management Information Systems
  • MIS 374, Business System Development

Marketing

  • I B 350, International Trade
  • MKT 338, Promotional Policies
  • MKT 460, Information and Analysis
  • MKT 363, Professional Selling and Sales Management
  • MKT 370, Marketing Policies
  • MKT 370K, Retail Merchandising
  • MKT 372, Marketing Seminar

Supply Chain Management

  • O M 368, Logistics and Inventory Management -- required
  • O M 337, Topic 1: Total Quality Management
  • O M 337, Topic 2: Supply Chain Modeling and Optimization
  • O M 337, Topic 3: Procurement and Supplier Management
  • O M 337, Topic 4: Information Systems for Operations

Finance

Finance is the study of resource allocation -- the process, markets, institutions, and instruments that provide for the transfer of money and wealth. The finance degree program offers students an opportunity to study the finance function in the business firm, the financial services firm, and the financial system.

The finance major presents students with the theoretical framework and analytical tools and techniques to handle a variety of finance and business functions. Students may choose one of five tracks: corporate finance and investment banking, energy finance, investment management, financial markets/banking, or real estate; students who do not wish to specialize may choose the general finance program.

Corporate finance and investment banking courses are designed to prepare students for careers as associates of corporate treasury departments, as corporate financial analysts, and as management consultants. Energy finance courses are designed to prepare students for positions in project financing, valuation, and risk management in the energy sector. Investment management courses are designed to give students a background suitable for starting positions as financial analysts with investment funds, investment banks, and other financial institutions. Financial markets/banking courses are designed to prepare students for a variety of financial institution-related careers, such as lending officer and financial analyst. Real estate courses are designed to give students a broad background in valuing and managing real estate; the track is intended to prepare students for positions in real estate commercial brokerage and appraisal, mortgage banking, loan underwriting, real estate development and investment, and property management.

Finance majors may specialize further by completing the Financial Analyst Program (FAP). This one and one-half year program allows competitively selected business students to work closely with finance faculty members and industry professionals to develop their skills and experience as analysts. The program may be combined with any of the finance options. Information about the Financial Analyst Program is available online and in the Department of Finance.

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. Finance 367 and 370.
  3. One of the following:

    1. Corporate Finance and Investment Banking

      1. Accounting 326 and Finance 374C.
      2. One of the following courses: Accounting 327, 329, 362, or 364.
      3. Two of the following courses: Finance 366P, 371M, 372, 373, 376, 377 (Topic 1: Portfolio Analysis and Management), either 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management) or 377 (Topic 5: Energy Financial Risk Management), and either 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) or 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis).[6]
    2. Energy Finance

      1. Accounting 326, Finance 374C, and Finance 377 (Topic 5: Energy Financial Risk Management).
      2. Two of the following courses: Finance 366P, 371M, 372, 373, 374S, 375F, 376, 377 (Topic 1: Portfolio Analysis and Management), and either 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) or 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis).[6]
    3. Investment Management

      1. Accounting 326 and Finance 377 (Topic 1: Portfolio Analysis and Management).
      2. Three of the following courses: Finance 366P, 371M, 372, 373, 374C, 374S, 375F, 376, either 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management) or 377 (Topic 5: Energy Financial Risk Management), and either 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) or 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis).[6]
    4. Financial Markets/Banking

      1. Accounting 326, and Finance 354 or 371M.
      2. Three of the following courses: Finance 354 or 371M (whichever is not used to fulfill requirement 1), 366P, 372, 373, 374C, 374S, 375F, 376, 377 (Topic 1: Portfolio Analysis and Management), either 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management) or 377 (Topic 5: Energy Financial Risk Management), and either 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) or 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis).[6]
    5. General Finance

      1. Accounting 326.
      2. Twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in finance or real estate. The following courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement: Finance 353, 357, 367, and 370. Finance 377 (Topic 2: Financial Risk Management) and 377 (Topic 5: Energy Financial Risk Management) may not both be used. Finance 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) and 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis) may not both be used; topic 3 is open only to students in the Financial Analyst Program.
      3. Only one independent study course may be counted toward the general finance option.
    6. Real Estate

      1. Finance 354 or 371M.
      2. Finance 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis) or 377 (Topic 4: Financial Analysis).[6]
      3. Accounting 326.
      4. Six semester hours of coursework in real estate.
      5. Only one independent study course may be counted toward the real estate option.
  4. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 120 semester hours.

International Business

Recognizing the role of the United States in world affairs and the importance of international operations to American business enterprise, this major offers a combination of basic business knowledge with an interdisciplinary study of international policies and practices. The curriculum is designed to help prepare students for positions in global business operations, government, or international agencies in the fields of economic development and international trade.

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. Twelve semester hours of coursework beyond the freshman level in a foreign language associated with the area studies specialization used to fulfill requirement 6 below. Six of the twelve required hours must be at the upper-division level.
  3. International Business 350 and 378.
  4. Six semester hours chosen from the following courses: Finance 376, International Business 372, and Marketing 372 (Topic 4: Global Marketing).
  5. Six semester hours of business electives.
  6. Nine semester hours of upper-division coursework focused on a specific geographic region. These courses must be approved by the international business faculty adviser. Examples of acceptable fields of study are Latin American studies; Middle Eastern studies; Asian studies; and Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies.
  7. All international business majors must study abroad for at least one semester or summer session. Students should study in a country or region associated with their foreign language and area studies specialization. Ideally, the study abroad experience should be in an immersion program that includes courses taken with local students.

    The international business faculty adviser must approve all study abroad programs in advance. Any McCombs School program is acceptable if it takes place in a country in which English is not the dominant language. (The CIBER Summer Study Abroad programs will not fulfill this requirement.) In addition, most affiliated study abroad programs available through the University's Study Abroad Office are acceptable, depending on the course of study.

    Students must complete the equivalent of at least six semester hours during their study abroad period. Credit earned abroad may be used to fulfill other degree requirements if appropriate.

  8. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 123 semester hours.

Management

The Department of Management offers courses in such areas as consulting, change management, human capital management, and entrepreneurship. Students may either choose from the available courses to customize a major in general management or follow the focused curriculum in consulting and change management.

The major objective of the general management track is to train broadly competent administrators for service in a wide variety of organizations -- public or private, product- or service-oriented, profit or not-for-profit. To accomplish this basic objective, the program offers the student the opportunity to acquire knowledge about the management of human and physical resources and to acquire skills useful in the management of any organization.

The consulting and change management track is designed to prepare students to become leaders in consulting firms, firms that require consulting advice, and firms implementing important changes. At times, every organization must renew its ability to compete; many firms use external advisers to assist in the renewal process. The consulting process often involves extensive analysis of the firm's competitive position, capabilities, organizational processes, and culture. Once a new direction is developed, the implementation of change must be managed. Such changes include introduction of new competitive thrusts, revision of organizational structures, incorporation of new technologies, and expansion into new geographic markets.

The requirements of the general management track are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. The following courses: Management 336, 374, and Operations Management 335.
  3. Twelve semester hours chosen from the following courses: Management 325, 337, Mechanical Engineering 366L, and Operations Management 337, 367, and 368.
  4. Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science.
  5. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 120 semester hours.

The requirements of the consulting and change management track are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. The following courses: Management 328, 336, 374, and Operations Management 335.
  3. Nine semester hours chosen from the following courses: Accounting 329, Management 325, 337, and Operations Management 337 (Topic 1: Total Quality Management). The following topics of Management 337 are recommended: Business Process Improvement, Groups and Teams, International Strategic Management, Leadership, Negotiation, and Project Management.
  4. Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science.
  5. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 120 semester hours.

Management Information Systems

There is a great demand for individuals with knowledge about both business and computer applications. Through a series of business core courses and business computer courses, the program in management information systems is intended to prepare a professional who can fully appreciate the complexity of information system design. The graduate is expected to have both the technical and the managerial knowledge to solve fundamental business problems in inventory control, production, forecasting, finance, cost accounting, and other areas. Courses are designed to provide a foundation in the integration of hardware, software, networking, and business functional analysis for business systems.

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. The following courses: Management Information Systems 304, 325, 333K, 365, 374, and 375.
  3. Three additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in management information systems.
  4. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 120 semester hours.

Marketing

Marketers provide the link between businesses that have goods and services to sell and customers who want to purchase them. The marketing process involves a variety of activities, including research, strategic planning, product development, sales management, and marketing communications. Because the opportunities in the profession are diverse, the marketing degree program allows students to specialize in areas in which they have the strongest interest, while offering them a solid background in the concepts of marketing and business. A marketing degree can lead to a career in such areas as sales management, retail merchandising and management, marketing management, marketing research, and promotional strategy and management.

The requirements of this program are

  1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. International Business 350 and Marketing 460 and 370.
  3. Nine semester hours chosen from Marketing 338, 363, 370K, and 372.
  4. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 121 semester hours.

Supply Chain Management

The supply chain management major is designed to prepare students to become leaders in supply chain management, a total systems approach taken by companies, suppliers, and partners to deliver manufactured products and services to the end customer. Information technology is used to integrate all elements of the supply chain from sourcing parts to coordination of retailers; this integration gives the enterprise a competitive advantage that is not available in traditional logistics systems. Entry-level positions in supply chain management include buyer, materials manager, risk management analyst, logistics planner, and staff consultant. Students are advised in the Department of Information, Risk, and Operations Management.

The requirements of this program are

  1. 1. The core curriculum requirements described in chapter 2 and the BBA degree requirements above.
  2. Management 336 and 374.
  3. Operations Management 335, 367, and 368.
  4. Six semester hours chosen from the following topics of Operations Management 337: Topic 1: Total Quality Management; Topic 2: Supply Chain Modeling and Optimization; Topic 3: Procurement and Supplier Management; and Topic 4: Information Systems for Operations.
  5. Additional elective coursework, if necessary, to provide a total of at least 120 semester hours.

1. Effective September 1, 2008. George W. Gau served as dean through August 31, 2008.

2. Texas Common Course Numbers BCIS 1305 and 1405 transfer as Management Information Systems 310.

3. Students who minor in management information systems may count six hours of lower-division and six hours of upper-division coursework. Students who minor in any area of finance must take Finance 367 as three of the required twelve hours.

4. The following are the "business core courses": Accounting 311 and 312, Business Administration 324, Finance 357, Legal Environment of Business 323, Management 336 or Operations Management 335, Management Information Systems 301, Marketing 337, and Statistics 309 and 371G.

5. These are the courses that may be counted toward this requirement for each major:

  • Accounting (BBA): Accounting 326, 327, 329, 362, and 364.
  • Business Honors Program: Business Administration 324H, Finance 357H, Legal Environment of Business 323H, Management 336H and 374H, Marketing 337H, Operations Management 335H, and Statistics 371H.
  • Engineering route to the BBA: Management 374, Operations Management 337 (Topic 5: Project Management), and the student's upper-division business block option courses.
  • Finance: Finance 357, 367, 370, and the courses required for the student's track.
  • International business: International Business 350 and 378, and the courses specified in requirements 4 and 6 of the major.
  • Management (consulting and change management track): Management 325, 328, 336, 337, and 374, and Operations Management 335 and 337 (Topic 1: Total Quality Management).
  • Management (general management track): Management 325, 336, 337, and 374, Mechanical Engineering 366L, and Operations Management 335, 337, 367, and 368.
  • Management information systems: Management Information Systems 325, 333K, 365, 374, and 375.
  • Marketing: International Business 350 and Marketing 338, 460, 363, 370, 370K, and 372.
  • Supply chain management: Management 336 and 374, and Operations Management 335, 337 (Topics 1: Total Quality Management, 2: Supply Chain Modeling and Optimization, 3: Procurement and Supplier Management, and 4: Information Systems for Operations), 367, and 368.

6. Only students in the Financial Analyst Program may register for Finance 366P and Finance 377 (Topic 3: Security Analysis).

Undergraduate Catalog, 2008-2010

page 1 of 3 in Chapter 4

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