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1. The University

Statement on Equal Educational Opportunity

The University of Texas at Austin is committed to an educational and working environment that provides equal opportunity to all members of the University community. In accordance with federal and state law, the University prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, citizenship, and veteran status. Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is also prohibited pursuant to University policy.

Title IX/ADA/504 Coordinators

Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender (Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972) and disability (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990). The University has designated the following persons as Coordinators to monitor compliance with these statutes and to resolve complaints of discrimination based on gender or disability.

Disability (Section 504/ADA)

For students and employees: Linda Millstone, Deputy to the Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement and Director of Equal Opportunity Services, NOA 4.302 (101 East 27th Street), (512) 471-1849

Gender (Title IX)

For students: Soncia Reagins-Lilly, Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, SSB 4.104 (100-B West Dean Keeton Street), (512) 471-1201

For employees: Linda Millstone, Deputy to the Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement and Director of Equal Opportunity Services, NOA 4.302 (101 East 27th Street), (512) 471-1849

Accreditation

The University of Texas at Austin is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's, master's, first-professional, and doctoral degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur GA 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of the University of Texas at Austin.

The University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas was established by the state legislature in 1881; by popular vote, the Main University was located at Austin and the Medical Branch at Galveston. The Austin campus was opened in September, 1883, with a faculty of 8 and a student body of 218; about three-quarters of the students were registered in the Academic Department and the remainder in the Law Department. In the intervening decades, the central campus has grown from 40 to more than 360 acres, while the student body has increased to about 39,000 undergraduates and 11,000 graduate students. In 1967, with the creation of The University of Texas System, the name of the Main University was changed to the University of Texas at Austin.

University students represent both the diverse population of the state and the full range of contemporary scholarship: an undergraduate may choose courses from more than 170 fields of study while pursuing any of more than 100 majors. Undergraduate study is supported by extensive computer facilities and by one of the largest academic libraries in the nation. Students also benefit from the broad range of scholarly and technical research conducted by the faculty and the research staff.

The city of Austin, with a population of about 750,000, is a relaxed and cosmopolitan setting for the University. The city is home to respected professional communities in theatre, dance, the visual arts, and classical and popular music that offer a wide range of cultural events. Students may also take part in recreational activities made possible by the temperate climate and Austin's location in the Hill Country of central Texas.

For further historical and current information about the University, see General Information.

The University of Texas System

The University of Texas at Austin is the largest component of The University of Texas System. The system is governed by a nine-member Board of Regents appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the state Senate. In addition to the University, the system consists of the following institutions. Information about the system and its components is published by The University of Texas System.

  • The University of Texas at Arlington
  • The University of Texas at Brownsville
  • The University of Texas at Dallas
  • The University of Texas at El Paso
  • The University of Texas - Pan American
  • The University of Texas of the Permian Basin
  • The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • The University of Texas at Tyler
  • The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
  • The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
  • The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
  • The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
  • The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler

Organization of the University

Academic Affairs

Subject to the supervision of the Board of Regents and to the authority the board has vested in administrative officers, the General Faculty is responsible for the governance of the University. The president is the chief executive officer; the executive vice president and provost is the chief academic officer. The administration of each college or school is the responsibility of that division's dean; in most colleges and schools, an associate or assistant dean for academic affairs oversees the day-to-day academic life of the division. Several colleges are further divided into departments and academic centers; academic and administrative matters in these units are the responsibility of the department chair or center director. A list of the University's colleges and schools and their constituent departments and academic centers is given in General Information.

Student Services

Student services are provided by the Division of Student Affairs, under the direction of the vice president for student affairs. The division consists of several units, which administer the University's programs in such areas as financial aid, student record management, counseling and learning support, housing and food, recreation, health services, and student media. The services of the student affairs units are described in General Information. Services provided by the colleges and schools are described in chapters 2 through 16 of this catalog.

Undergraduate Degrees

The University offers the following undergraduate degrees.

Bachelor of Architecture BArch
Bachelor of Arts BA
Bachelor of Arts in Art BAArt
Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences BAGeoSci
Bachelor of Arts in Music BAMusic
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance BATD
Bachelor of Business Administration BBA
Bachelor of Fine Arts BFA
Bachelor of Journalism BJ
Bachelor of Music BMusic
Bachelor of Science in Advertising BSAdv
Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering BSAsE
Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development BSALD
Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering BSArchE
Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies BSArchStds
Bachelor of Science in Astronomy BSAst
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training BSAthlTrng
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry BSBioch
Bachelor of Science in Biology BSBio
Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering BSBiomedE
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering BSChE
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry BSCh
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering BSCE
Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science BSClnLabSci
Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders BSCSD
Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies BSCommStds
Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences BSCS
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering BSEE
Bachelor of Science in Geography and the Environment[1] BSGrg&Environ
Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences BSGeoSci
Bachelor of Science in Geosystems Engineering and Hydrogeology BSGEH
Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences BSHDFS
Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Science BSIntrdscSci
Bachelor of Science in Interior Design BSID
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health[2] BSKin&Health
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics BSMath
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering BSME
Bachelor of Science in Nursing BSN
Bachelor of Science in Nutrition BSNtr
Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering BSPE
Bachelor of Science in Physics BSPhy
Bachelor of Science in Psychology BSPsy
Bachelor of Science in Public Relations BSPR
Bachelor of Science in Radio-Television-Film BSRTF
Bachelor of Science in Textiles and Apparel BSTA
Bachelor of Social Work BSW
Doctor of Pharmacy PharmD

Degree Programs

The University offers the undergraduate majors listed in the first column; the degree(s) available in each field are given in the second column. All undergraduate degree programs require students to complete at least 120 semester hours of coursework; some programs require more coursework. Degree programs are described in chapters 3 through 16.

The University offers graduate study in most of the following areas and in other fields. Information about graduate courses and degrees and other information for graduate students is given in the Graduate Catalog.

A list of the fields of study in which undergraduate and graduate courses are offered is given in Appendix B.

School of Architecture

Architecture BArch
Architectural studies BSArchStds
Interior design BSID

Red McCombs School of Business

Business Honors Program BBA
Department of Accounting
Accounting BBA
Integrated approach BBA and MPA
Department of Finance
Finance BBA
Department of Information, Risk, and Operations Management
Management information systems BBA
Engineering route to the Bachelor of Business Administration BBA
Supply chain management BBA
Department of Management
Management BBA
Department of Marketing
International business BBA
Marketing BBA

College of Communication

Department of Advertising
Advertising BSAdv
Public relations BSPR
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Communication sciences and disorders BSCSD
Department of Communication Studies
Communication studies BSCommStds
School of Journalism
Journalism BJ
Department of Radio-Television-Film
Radio-television-film BSRTF

College of Education

All-level generic special education BSALD
Early childhood through grade four generalist[3] BSALD
Youth and community studies BSALD
Department of Kinesiology and Health Education[4]
Applied movement science BSKin&Health
Athletic training BSAthlTrng
Exercise science BSKin&Health
Health promotion BSKin&Health
Physical culture and sports BSKin&Health
Sport management BSKin&Health

Cockrell School of Engineering

Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Aerospace engineering BSAsE
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical engineering BSBiomedE
Department of Chemical Engineering
Chemical engineering BSChE
Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering
Architectural engineering BSArchE
Civil engineering BSCE
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Electrical engineering BSEE
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical engineering BSME
Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering
Petroleum engineering BSPE
Geosystems engineering and hydrogeology[5] BSGEH

College of Fine Arts

Department of Art and Art History
Art history BAArt
Design BFA
Studio art BAArt, BFA
Visual art studies BFA
Sarah and Ernest Butler School of Music
Music BAMusic
Composition BMusic
Jazz composition BMusic
Performance[6] BMusic
Jazz performance[6] BMusic
Music business BMusic
Music studies BMusic
Recording technology BMusic
Department of Theatre and Dance
Theatre and dance BATD
Theatre studies BFA
Dance BFA

John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences

Department of Geological Sciences
Geological sciences BAGeoSci
Geological sciences Option I: General geology BAGeoSci
Option II: Geophysics BAGeoSci
Option III: Hydrogeology BAGeoSci
Option IV: Environmental science and sustainability BAGeoSci
Option V: Teaching BAGeoSci
Geosystems engineering[7] BSGEH

College of Liberal Arts

Humanities BA
International relations and global studies[8] BA
John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies
Ethnic studies[9] BA
Department of American Studies
American studies BA
Department of Anthropology
Anthropology BA
Center for Asian American Studies
Ethnic studies[9] BA
Department of Asian Studies
Asian cultures and languages[10] BA
Asian studies BA
Department of Classics
Ancient history and classical civilization BA
Classical archaeology BA
Classics BA
Greek BA
Latin BA
Department of Economics
Economics BA
Department of English
English BA
Center for European Studies
European studies BA
Department of French and Italian
French BA
Italian BA
Department of Geography and the Environment
Geography BA
Geography and the environment BSGrg&Environ[11]
Urban studies BA
Department of Germanic Studies
German BA
Scandinavian studies BA
Department of Government
Government BA
Department of History
History BA
Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies
Jewish studies BA
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Latin American studies BA
Department of Linguistics
Linguistics BA
Center for Mexican American Studies
Ethnic studies[12] BA
Department of Middle Eastern Studies
Arabic language and literature BA
Hebrew language and literature BA
Islamic studies BA
Middle Eastern studies BA
Persian language and literature BA
Turkish language and literature BA
Department of Philosophy
Philosophy BA
Plan II Honors Program
Plan II BA
Department of Psychology
Psychology BA, BSPsy
Department of Religious Studies
Religious studies BA
Department of Rhetoric and Writing
Rhetoric and writing BA
Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies BA
Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies
Czech language and culture BA
Russian language and culture BA
Department of Sociology
Sociology BA
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Portuguese BA
Spanish BA
Center for Women's and Gender Studies
Women's and gender studies BA

College of Natural Sciences

Interdisciplinary science Option I: Middle grades teaching in mathematics and science BSIntrdscSci
Option II: Secondary school teaching in computer sciences and mathematics BSIntrdscSci
Department of Astronomy
Astronomy BA
Astronomy Option I: Astronomy BSAst
Option II: Astronomy honors BSAst
School of Biological Sciences
Biology BA
Biology Option I: Ecology, evolution, and behavior BSBio
Option II: Human biology BSBio
Option III: Marine and freshwater biology BSBio
Option IV: Microbiology BSBio
Option V: Cell and molecular biology BSBio
Option VI: Neurobiology BSBio
Option VII: Plant biology BSBio
Option VIII: Teaching BSBio
Option IX: Biology honors BSBio
Option X: Computational biology BSBio
Clinical laboratory science BSClnLabSci
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Biochemistry BA
Biochemistry Option I: Biochemistry BSBioch
Option II: Computation BSBioch
Option III: Biochemistry honors BSBioch
Chemistry BA
Chemistry Option I: Chemistry BSCh
Option II: Computation BSCh
Option III: Teaching BSCh
Option IV: Chemistry honors BSCh
Department of Computer Sciences
Computer sciences BA
Computer sciences Option I: Computer sciences BSCS
Option II: Turing Scholars Honors BSCS
Option III: Computer sciences honors BSCS
Option IV: Integrated approach BSCS and MSCS
School of Human Ecology
Human development and family sciences Option I: Early childhood BSHDFS
Option II: Human development BSHDFS
Option III: Families and personal relationships BSHDFS
Option IV: Families and society BSHDFS
Option V: General human development and family sciences BSHDFS
Option VI: Human development and family sciences honors BSHDFS
Human ecology BA
Nutrition Option I: Dietetics BSNtr
Option II: Nutritional sciences BSNtr
Option III: Nutrition in business BSNtr
Option IV: Teaching BSNtr
Option V: Nutrition honors BSNtr
Option VI: International nutrition BSNtr
Textiles and apparel Option I: Apparel design and conservation BSTA
Option II: Retail merchandising BSTA
Department of Mathematics
Mathematics BA
Mathematics Option I: Actuarial science BSMath
Option II: Applied mathematics BSMath
Option III: Mathematical sciences BSMath
Option IV: Pure mathematics BSMath
Option V: Teaching BSMath
Option VI: Mathematics honors BSMath
Department of Physics
Physics BA
Physics Option I: Physics BSPhy
Option II: Computation BSPhy
Option III: Radiation physics BSPhy
Option IV: Space sciences BSPhy
Option V: Teaching BSPhy
Option VI: Physics honors BSPhy
School of Nursing
Nursing BSN
College of Pharmacy
Pharmacy PharmD
School of Social Work
Social work BSW

Simultaneous Majors

With proper approval, an undergraduate may pursue two majors simultaneously. The two majors may lead either to a single degree or to two degrees. For example, a student who majors simultaneously in history and government is awarded a single Bachelor of Arts degree; a student who majors simultaneously in journalism and government receives the Bachelor of Journalism and the Bachelor of Arts.

The student is admitted to the University with a single major. He or she may choose a second major after completing thirty semester hours of coursework in residence at the University. The student must follow any application procedures and meet any admission requirements that have been established for the second major; information about these and other relevant college policies is available from the dean.

Students with simultaneous majors must pay all applicable major-related fees for both fields, and they have the right to use the advising and student services provided by both colleges. Decisions about admission to programs, honors, scholastic probation, and dismissal are based independently on the criteria for each major.

A student who chooses to pursue two majors simultaneously is expected to take responsibility for his or her educational development. The student must know and abide by all policies of each of the colleges in which he or she is enrolled. The student must also know and meet the requirements of both degree programs, enroll in courses appropriate to both, meet prerequisites and take courses in the proper sequence, and seek advice from both colleges about degree requirements and other University policies when necessary.

Interdisciplinary Opportunities

Several of the majors listed in the section "Degree Programs" above are interdisciplinary in nature. The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering, for example, is offered by the Cockrell School of Engineering but involves substantial coursework in the life and physical sciences; in the various area studies programs in the College of Liberal Arts, such as Latin American studies and Middle Eastern studies, students examine a geographic area from the viewpoints of several traditional disciplines.

In addition to interdisciplinary majors, the simultaneous major option described above, and the formal dual degree programs described later in this catalog, the University provides various ways for students to add breadth and diversity to their studies. Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts may complete the requirements of one of the concentrations described in chapter 11; the concentrations are also open to students outside liberal arts and natural sciences with their deans' approval. The Study Abroad program, described in General Information, allows students to consider their own field from the unique viewpoint of another culture. The Bridging Disciplines Programs and other initiatives of the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies help students traverse the traditional boundaries between colleges and disciplines.

Cross-disciplinary initiatives of the colleges and schools are often described on their Web sites, which may be reached via http://www.utexas.edu/dept/.

Preprofessional Programs

Preparation for Health Professions

The rapid expansion and diversification of services designed to meet the health needs of society provide students with a variety of career opportunities in health care. However, since competition for admission to professional school programs is keen, it is important to maintain a strong academic record.

Advisory Services

Students interested in a health career should contact the Health Professions Office, T. S. Painter Hall, suite 5.03. The Health Professions Office maintains a Web page and a reference collection of information on a broad spectrum of health careers. The office also sponsors programs on topics of interest throughout the year and maintains an e-mail distribution list. Individual course and career advising concerning preparation for admission to professional schools can be arranged through the Health Professions Office.

In general, professional schools do not indicate a preferred undergraduate major, leaving the student free to choose a degree program suited to his or her interests and abilities. The student should complete minimum professional school course requirements before taking a nationally standardized admission test such as the Dental Admission Test, Medical College Admission Test, Pharmacy College Admission Test, or Graduate Record Examinations. The Health Professions Office provides advice concerning courses that meet professional school admission requirements; advising for degree requirements is available in the student's major department. Students are encouraged to register using the special advising area code appropriate to the health career they are pursuing.

A student planning to pursue a degree in clinical laboratory science, nursing, or dietetics at the University should consult an adviser in the appropriate department or school.

Preparation for Dentistry, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine

Transfer of Professional School Coursework toward an Undergraduate Degree

All students preparing for professional training in dentistry, medicine, or veterinary medicine should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice before entering professional school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

If a preprofessional student undertakes work leading to an established undergraduate degree in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences but is accepted into the professional school before finishing the degree, it may be possible by special petition for the student to use professional school coursework toward the degree as transfer hours. In this instance, to graduate the student must meet, without exception, all requirements for the degree. This includes all residence rules--both general and specific--for the desired degree, except as indicated in section 3 below. If the petition is approved, limited transfer of unspecified upper-division credit in chemistry and biology is allowed as applicable and necessary to the degree.

University regulations allow a student to transfer six of the last thirty semester hours from another undergraduate school if other residence requirements have been met. If a preprofessional student meets certain additional requirements as outlined below, it may be possible for the student to transfer and use toward the degree a limited number of semester hours from a professional school.

  1. The maximum number of hours allowed for transfer and application toward a University degree is

    1. Dental schools: A total of twelve semester hours of credit, of which nine hours are upper-division unspecified biology and three hours are upper-division unspecified chemistry.
    2. Medical schools (including schools of osteopathic medicine): A total of eighteen semester hours of credit, of which twelve hours are upper-division unspecified biology and six hours are upper-division unspecified chemistry.
    3. Veterinary schools: A total of twelve semester hours of upper-division unspecified biology.
  2. To be eligible to receive such transfer hours from a professional school the student must

    1. Receive dean's certification indicating completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours counted toward the degree.
    2. Provide an official transcript indicating satisfactory completion of the traditional first year at an accredited and approved United States school of dentistry, medicine, or veterinary medicine. If eligible, the student may petition the academic dean to have the Office of Admissions record on the University transcript, without letter grade, the total number of semester hours transferred as noted in section 1 above.
  3. After the student's eligibility is verified and the hours described in section 1 above are accepted for transfer to the University, degree credit may be granted as follows:

    1. Up to six of these hours may be used as appropriate and necessary toward a degree, as certified by the student's academic dean. These initial six semester hours must include all transfer work used within the last thirty semester hours counted toward the student's degree.
    2. Additional hours beyond the initial six, but limited to the total allowable, may be used as elective credit toward the degree upon written petition to and final approval of the student's academic dean.
    3. Additional hours beyond the initial six, but limited to the total allowable, may be used in fulfillment of specific requirements of the major and/or other required coursework for the degree upon written petition to and final approval of the student's academic dean, but only if the major department or the responsible degree program unit has endorsed the request.

Preparation for Dentistry

The minimum admission requirements for most Texas dental schools are two years of biological science, including at least one year of formal laboratory work, one year of general chemistry, one semester of biochemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of English, and one year of physics. Required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. All applicants to dental schools must take the Dental Admission Test (DAT) and submit their applications to the schools approximately one year in advance of planned entrance. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Admissions Requirements of United States and Canadian Dental Schools and dental school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

All students should plan to complete a bachelor's degree in the field of their choice before entering dental school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

Preparation for Medicine

The minimum admission requirements for most Texas medical schools are two years of biological science, including at least one year of formal laboratory work, one-half year of calculus or statistics, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of English, and one year of physics. One semester of biochemistry is highly recommended and is required by at least one Texas medical school. Required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. Applicants to medical schools must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and submit their applications to the schools approximately one year in advance of planned entrance. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Medical School Admission Requirements and medical school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are also available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

All students should plan to complete a bachelor's degree in the field of their choice before entering medical school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

Preparation for Veterinary Medicine

Students seeking to prepare for a career in veterinary medicine must complete at least two years of required coursework, including biological science, chemistry, biochemistry, English, mathematics, and physics. Six to twelve months before planned entrance, all applicants to schools of veterinary medicine must take a nationally standardized test and submit their applications. Some schools require the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), others the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements and veterinary medical school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

Preparation for Pharmacy

Admission requirements of professional pharmacy programs vary, but all require that the applicant have completed from thirty to seventy semester hours of prepharmacy coursework. The coursework generally includes one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of mathematics, one semester of physics, one and one-half years of biological science, and one year of English; all required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. Applicants submit their applications to the professional schools six to nine months before planned entrance; some schools require applicants to take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT). For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Pharmacy School Admission Requirements and pharmacy school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

Four of the ninety-one United States colleges of pharmacy are in Texas, at the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Houston, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, and Texas Southern University.

Preparation for the Allied Health Sciences

The allied health sciences include such programs as allied health education, biomedical communications, medical illustration, dental hygiene, dietetics, health care administration, health information management, clinical laboratory science, occupational therapy, optometry, physical therapy, physician assistant, and rehabilitation technology.

Requirements for admission to allied health science programs vary greatly, but competition to enter many programs is keen. Some programs require sixty to ninety semester hours of college study prior to entrance into the professional school; others require completion of a baccalaureate degree prior to entrance. Application deadlines vary, but applications are usually submitted six to twelve months before planned entrance. Upon completion of the professional school program, students are awarded degrees and/or certificates of proficiency by the professional school. Most allied health sciences programs are not offered at the University; however, some students who complete their studies at a University of Texas System school of allied health sciences may be eligible or required to receive a baccalaureate degree jointly awarded by the University of Texas at Austin and a University of Texas System school of allied health sciences. If a student has received a baccalaureate or graduate degree from a University of Texas System general academic institution before enrolling at a University of Texas System health science center to pursue a second baccalaureate degree, the health science center awards the second degree.

Information is provided by the Health Professions Office about programs available, entrance requirements, prerequisite courses, admission statistics, application procedures, and required tests.

Changes in admission requirements for allied health programs occur frequently. Therefore, each semester, students should check for updates on the Health Professions Office and professional school Web sites.

Preparation for Law

Information about admission to the School of Law at the University is given in General Information; law school admission procedures are described in the Law School Catalog.

There is no sequential arrangement of courses prescribed for a prelaw program; neither is any particular major specified. In discussing the objectives of prelegal education, the Association of American Law Schools puts special emphasis on comprehension and expression in words, critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and analytical power in thinking. The association suggests that courses relevant to these objectives are those dealing with the communication of ideas, logic and mathematics, the social sciences, history, philosophy, and the physical sciences. Some understanding of accounting principles is also recommended, although this may be gained after entrance to law school. For answers to specific questions about a prelaw program, the student should consult the prelaw adviser in his or her major department.

Services for prelaw students in the College of Liberal Arts are provided by Liberal Arts Career Services (LACS), Peter T. Flawn Academic Center 18. These include the annual fall law fair, information on how to research law schools, and assistance with the application procedure, including the personal statement. Prelaw students in all majors may consult the prelaw adviser in LACS. Additional information about preparation for law is published by the College of Liberal Arts.

Like most schools offering professional training, the School of Law at the University has a number of specific requirements and limitations. For example, to be eligible for admission to the School of Law the student must have completed a baccalaureate degree. Students are admitted only at the beginning of the long session. Each applicant for admission must take the Law School Admission Test administered by the Law School Admission Council. This is usually taken in October of the senior year. The test score and undergraduate academic performance are important in determining eligibility for admission to law school; but all law schools consider a variety of factors in their admission policies, and no single factor by itself will guarantee admission or denial.

Preparation for Teacher Certification

Students who plan to teach in Texas public schools in the early grades must earn the Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development in the College of Education and must meet the appropriate state certification requirements.

Students who plan to teach in Texas public middle schools or high schools must earn a bachelor's degree in the field they intend to teach and must meet the requirements for teacher certification. Students pursuing either middle grades or secondary math or science certification must follow the curriculum prescribed by the UTeach-Natural Sciences program. Students pursuing either middle grades or secondary certification in English language arts, social studies, or languages other than English must follow the curriculum prescribed by the UTeach-Liberal Arts program. Students pursuing other areas of certification should consult an adviser in the major department about degree requirements and an adviser in the College of Education about certification requirements.

Coursework in the Graduate School and the School of Law

Graduate Work for Undergraduate Credit

An undergraduate may enroll in a graduate course under the following conditions:

  1. He or she must be an upper-division student and must fulfill the prerequisite for the course (except graduate standing).
  2. He or she must have a University grade point average of at least 3.00.
  3. He or she must receive the consent of the instructor of the course and of the graduate adviser for the field in which the course is offered. Some colleges and schools may also require the approval of the dean's office. Individual divisions may impose additional requirements or bar undergraduates from enrolling in graduate courses.
  4. Students in most colleges must have their dean's approval before they register for a graduate course.

Undergraduate students may not enroll in graduate courses that have fewer than five graduate students enrolled.

A graduate course taken by an undergraduate is counted toward the student's bachelor's degree in the same way that upper-division courses are counted, unless the course is reserved for graduate credit as described in the next section. Courses reserved for graduate credit may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of an undergraduate degree.

An undergraduate student enrolled in a graduate course is subject to all University regulations affecting undergraduates.

Reservation of Work by Undergraduates for Graduate Credit

Under the following conditions, a degree-seeking undergraduate may enroll in a graduate course and reserve that course for credit toward a graduate degree.

  1. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 3.00.
  2. The student must have completed at least ninety semester hours of coursework toward an undergraduate degree.
  3. The student may not register for more than fifteen semester hours in the semester or for more than twelve semester hours in the summer session in which the course is reserved.
  4. No more than twelve semester hours may be reserved for graduate credit.
  5. All courses reserved for graduate credit must be approved by the twelfth class day of the semester or the fourth class day of the summer session by the course instructor, the student's undergraduate adviser, the graduate adviser in the student's proposed graduate major area, the dean of the student's undergraduate college, and the graduate dean. A form for this purpose is available in the Office of Graduate Studies.

An undergraduate student enrolled in a graduate course is subject to all University regulations affecting undergraduates.

A student who reserves courses for graduate credit must be admitted to a University graduate program through regular channels before the credit may be applied toward a graduate degree. By allowing the student to earn graduate credit while still an undergraduate, the University makes no guarantee of the student's admissibility to any graduate program.

Courses in the School of Law

Undergraduate students may not take courses in the School of Law.

Honors

Except as noted, the following programs, scholarships, and organizations are open to all qualified undergraduates. Honors available through the colleges and schools are described in chapters 3 through 16. Other University-wide honors programs are described in chapter 2.

Honor Societies for Freshmen

Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta Sigma are national honor societies that recognize scholastic attainment during the freshman year. Members are chosen each fall and spring. Membership is offered to students who earn a grade point average of at least 3.50 during the first semester of their freshman year while completing at least twelve semester hours of coursework. Students who do not qualify during the first semester may become eligible by earning a grade point average of at least 3.50 for the first two semesters of work combined.

Junior Fellows Program

The Junior Fellows Program provides recognition for outstanding students who have completed four semesters, or about sixty semester hours of coursework. Chosen annually from the best students across the campus, junior fellows are given the opportunity to do independent study and research with distinguished professors of their choice and to have that research supported by small grants, if necessary. The program is administered by the College of Liberal Arts, but undergraduates in all colleges and schools are eligible to take part. Students who wish to be considered should apply in February. Application forms are available in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206.

College Scholars

On Honors Day each spring, the University designates outstanding students as College Scholars and Distinguished College Scholars, on the basis of registration and grade point average requirements for courses taken in residence at the University, as specified below. Students who are eligible for recognition receive invitations to the Honors Day convocation about three weeks before Honors Day.

To be designated a College Scholar, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The student must be registered as an undergraduate for at least twelve semester hours of coursework in residence, unless he or she lacks fewer than twelve hours to complete degree requirements. Students who hold an undergraduate degree are not eligible.
  2. The student must have completed at least twelve semester hours of coursework in residence in either the spring or the fall semester of the previous calendar year.
  3. The student must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework at the University, excluding credit by examination, and at least sixty semester hours of college coursework, including transferred work and credit by examination.
  4. The student must have an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.50.

To be designated a Distinguished College Scholar, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The student must be registered as an undergraduate for at least fifteen semester hours of coursework in residence, unless he or she lacks fewer than fifteen hours to complete degree requirements. Students who hold an undergraduate degree are not eligible.
  2. The student must have completed at least fifteen semester hours of coursework in residence in either the spring or the fall semester of the previous calendar year.
  3. The student must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework at the University, excluding credit by examination, and at least sixty semester hours of college coursework, including transferred work and credit by examination.
  4. The student must have an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.80.

University Honors

Each semester, undergraduates who complete a full course load and earn outstanding grades are recognized by inclusion on the University Honors list. Each time a student is included on the list, his or her official record also shows the award of University Honors for that semester. The list is compiled at the end of the fall and spring semesters but not at the end of the summer session. To be included, a student must earn at least forty-five grade points and a grade point average of at least 3.50 on courses completed in residence and must have no incomplete grades (symbol X).

Students are notified on the semester grade report of their inclusion on the list.

Scholarships

British Marshall scholarships. British Marshall scholarships allow young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the system of higher education of their choice in the United Kingdom. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study. Up to forty new awards are offered every year in the United States. Students should apply in their senior year. Applications are due in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in early September.

Rhodes scholarships. Rhodes scholarships are for outstanding United States citizens who are between eighteen and twenty-four on October 1 of the year of application. Students should apply in their senior year. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study at the University of Oxford. Thirty-two scholarships are assigned annually to the United States. Applications are due in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in early September.

Harry S. Truman scholarships. The Harry S. Truman Foundation awards seventy-five to eighty $30,000 merit-based scholarships annually to college students who wish to attend graduate school in preparation for careers in government or elsewhere in public service. Applicants must be in the top quarter of their class, with a grade point average of at least 3.80, and must be United States citizens or nationals. Each scholarship covers tuition, fees, books, and room and board, to a maximum of $3,000 for the student's senior year. In addition, Truman Scholars receive $13,500 yearly if enrolled in a two-year graduate program or $9,000 yearly if enrolled in a three-year graduate program. They also receive leadership training, graduate school counseling, preferential admission and merit-based aid at some premier graduate institutions, and internship opportunities with federal agencies. Students who will be seniors the following academic year should apply to the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in mid-October.

Graduation with University Honors

To be eligible to graduate with University Honors, an undergraduate must have completed at least sixty semester hours at the University of Texas at Austin. Graduation with University Honors is based on the average of all grades earned in courses taken in residence at the University, whether the courses were passed, failed, or repeated. Courses taken pass/fail are counted in the sixty-hour minimum, but only letter grades (including Fs in pass/fail courses) are used to determine the grade point average.

The faculty of each college or school determines the percentage of the graduating class of that division to receive honors, high honors, and highest honors and the minimum grade point average for each category, subject to the following requirements:

  1. No more than 20 percent of the May graduating class of each college or school may receive honors, high honors, and highest honors. No more than 10 percent of the class may receive high honors and highest honors. No more than 4 percent may receive highest honors.
  2. Honors graduates must have a grade point average of at least 3.30 in courses taken in residence at the University

The faculty may adopt college- or school-wide standards or may designate grade point average and percentage requirements for each program within the college or school, but the percentage of the college or school class receiving honors, high honors, and highest honors may not exceed those above.

Percentage requirements are not applied to August and December graduating classes. The grade point averages established for May graduates are applied to the following August and December classes to determine honors, high honors, and highest honors.

University Honors eligibility, by class rank and GPA
Honors High Honors Highest Honors
College or School Rank Min. GPA [13] Rank Min. GPA [13] Rank Min. GPA [13]
School of Architecture top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
McCombs School of Business [14] top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
College of Communication [15] top 20% 3.465 top 10% 3.665 top 4% 3.865
College of Education top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
Cockrell School of Engineering [16] top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.70 top 4% 3.85
College of Fine Arts [17] top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.60 top 4% 3.85
Jackson School of Geosciences top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
College of Liberal Arts top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
College of Natural Sciences top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
School of Nursing top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
College of Pharmacy top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
School of Social Work top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30

Academic Advising

The University views sound academic advising as a significant responsibility in educating students. Academic advisers assist students in developing intellectual potential and exploring educational opportunities and life goals. Many people in the campus community contribute to the advising process, including faculty, staff, student, and professional advisers. Through the relationship established between adviser and student within a friendly, helpful, and professional atmosphere, a student has the opportunity to learn about educational options, degree requirements, and academic policies and procedures; to clarify educational objectives; to plan and pursue programs consistent with abilities, interests, and life goals; and to use all resources of the University to best advantage.

Ultimately, the student is responsible for seeking adequate academic advice, for knowing and meeting degree requirements, and for enrolling in appropriate courses to ensure orderly and timely progress toward a degree. Frequent adviser contact provides students with current academic information and promotes progress toward educational goals. The University supports that progress and encourages effective academic advising campus-wide.

The advising systems of the colleges and schools are described in chapters 3 through 16.

Student Responsibility

While University faculty and staff members give students academic advice and assistance, each student is expected to take responsibility for his or her education and personal development. The student must know and abide by the academic and disciplinary policies given in this catalog and in General Information, including rules governing quantity of work, the standard of work required to continue in the University, scholastic probation and dismissal, and enforced withdrawal. The student must also know and meet the requirements of his or her degree program, including the University's basic education requirements; must enroll in courses appropriate to the program; must meet prerequisites and take courses in the proper sequence to ensure orderly and timely progress; and must seek advice about degree requirements and other University policies when necessary.

The student must give correct local and permanent postal addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail address to the Office of the Registrar and to the offices of the student's deans and must notify these offices immediately of any changes. Official correspondence is sent to the postal or e-mail address last given to the registrar; if the student has failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered.

The student must verify his or her schedule of classes each semester, must see that necessary corrections are made, and must keep documentation of all schedule changes and other transactions.

All students should be familiar with the following sources of information:

University catalogs. General Information gives important information about academic policies and procedures that apply to all students. It includes the official academic calendar, admission procedures and residence requirements, information about tuition and fees, and policies on quantity of work, grades and the grade point average, credit by examination and correspondence, adding and dropping courses, withdrawal from the University, and scholastic probation and dismissal. This catalog also gives historical and current information about the University's organization and physical facilities. It describes the services of the Division of Student Affairs and the libraries and research facilities that support the University's academic programs.

The Undergraduate Catalog gives information about degrees offered by the undergraduate divisions and lists the faculty. The chapter for each college or school describes the academic policies and procedures that apply to students in that division and lists the division's undergraduate courses. The Graduate Catalog and the Law School Catalog give similar information about graduate programs and the programs of the School of Law.

Printed catalogs are available at campus-area bookstores and from the Office of the Registrar Catalog Store at TXShop. The online catalogs are available at the registrar's Web site.

The Course Schedule. The Course Schedule is published by the Office of the Registrar and is available before registration for each semester and summer session. It includes information about registration procedures; times, locations, instructors, prerequisites, and special fees of classes offered; and advising locations.

Dean's offices. In each college, the office of the assistant or associate dean for student affairs serves as a central source of information about academic affairs and student services. The student should consult the dean's office staff for information not provided in the publications listed above; a student who is in doubt about any University regulation should always seek clarification in the dean's office before proceeding.

Graduation

The University holds commencement exercises at the end of the spring semester. Each college and school also holds a commencement ceremony in the spring, and many hold graduation exercises in the fall. Graduating students are encouraged to participate. Those who graduate in the summer or fall may attend Commencement the following spring. Each student should consult his or her dean early in the semester of graduation for information about commencement activities and procedures.

No degree will be conferred except on publicly announced dates.

General Requirements

To receive an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin, a student must fulfill all requirements for the degree as set forth in a catalog under which he or she is eligible to graduate and any special requirements of the college or school and department offering the degree, as well as the following minimum general requirements:

  1. The student must have a grade point average of at least 2.00 on all courses undertaken at the University (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded. Additional requirements imposed by a college or school, if any, are given in the college's chapter of this catalog.
  2. The student must fulfill the following requirements regarding coursework taken in residence. Residence credit includes only courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin; it does not include credit by examination, courses taken by extension or correspondence, and online courses that are recorded as transfer credit. Coursework in University-approved affiliated study abroad programs (international provider programs) is treated as residence credit for requirements 2a and 2b below. However, coursework in University-approved affiliated study abroad programs may not be used to fulfill requirement 2c.

    1. The student must complete in residence at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.[18]
    2. Twenty-four of the last thirty semester hours counted toward the degree must be completed in residence.
    3. At least six semester hours of advanced coursework in the major must be completed in residence.

    Additional requirements imposed by a college or school, if any, are given in the college's chapter of this catalog. Many degree plans include residence rules in addition to the above University-wide requirements; the appropriate academic units have the discretion to determine applicability of University-approved affiliated study abroad credit toward all college- and school-specific requirements for coursework in residence. Course equivalency and University approval of study abroad courses are determined by the appropriate academic units.

  3. Coursework in American government and American history (the legislative requirement):

    1. Each student must complete six semester hours of coursework in American government, including Texas government. Because these courses are not electives, they may not be taken on the pass/fail basis at the University. Credit by examination may be counted toward the requirement.

      The six hours of coursework used to fulfill the requirement must cover both the United States and the Texas constitutions. Texas colleges and universities differ in the way they include this material in the courses they offer. As a result, some combinations of government courses taken at different institutions do not fulfill the requirement, even though they provide six hours of credit. The following combinations of coursework, some of which include transferred work, fulfill the government requirement at the University:

      1. Government 310L and 312L
      2. Government 310L and three hours of transfer credit in United States government (entered into the student's University record as "GOV 3 US")
      3. Government 310L and three hours of transfer credit in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX")
      4. Three hours of transfer credit in United States government ("GOV 3 US") and three hours of transfer credit in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX")

      A number of sections of Government 312L are offered each semester. Because some of these sections deal with state government and some deal with federal government, credit for Government 312L in combination with transfer credit in United States government ("GOV 3 US") or in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX") may fail to fulfill the legislative requirement. If a student has such a combination of credit, his or her dean's office will evaluate the coursework to determine whether both the state and the federal components of the requirement have been met.

      Students in the Cockrell School of Engineering may count three hours of ROTC coursework (air force science, military science, or naval science) toward fulfillment of this requirement. Students in the College of Pharmacy may substitute three hours of ROTC coursework for Government 312L. In both colleges, ROTC coursework may be counted toward the government requirement only by students who complete the ROTC program and receive a commission.

    2. Each student must complete six semester hours of coursework in American history. Up to three hours in Texas history may be counted toward this requirement. Because these courses are not electives, they may not be taken on the pass/fail basis at the University. Credit by examination may be counted toward the requirement.

    In the College of Liberal Arts, ROTC courses that are cross-listed may be used as appropriate to fulfill other degree requirements. Students should consult the staff in the Office of the Dean, Student Division, to learn whether an ROTC course may be counted toward the legislative requirement.

  4. A candidate for a degree must be registered at the University either in residence or in absentia the semester or summer session the degree is to be awarded and must apply to the dean for the degree no later than the date specified in the official academic calendar. To receive a degree from the McCombs School of Business, the Cockrell School of Engineering, or the College of Communication, Education, or Natural Sciences, the student must be registered in that college or school.

Multiple Degrees

No second bachelor's degree will be conferred until the candidate has completed at least twenty-four semester hours in addition to those counted toward the bachelor's degree that requires the higher number of hours of credit. The McCombs School of Business, the Cockrell School of Engineering, the College of Education, and the School of Nursing require the student to complete at least twenty-four hours in addition to those counted toward the first bachelor's degree. A student may not receive the same degree twice.

Graduation under a Particular Catalog

To receive a bachelor's degree, a student must fulfill all the degree requirements in a catalog under which he or she is eligible to graduate; the choices open to students in each college and school are explained below. The student must complete degree requirements within a specified time period; if he or she leaves school to enter military service during a national emergency, the time required to meet the military obligation is excluded from the time allowed for completion of the degree.

A student who transfers to the University from another Texas public institution of higher education has the same catalog choices that he or she would have had if the dates of attendance at the University had been the same as the dates of attendance at the other institution.

Since each college and school must retain the flexibility to improve its curriculum, course offerings may be changed during the student's education. If a course required under a previous catalog is no longer offered, students eligible to graduate according to that catalog should consult the dean of the college to learn whether another course may be used to fulfill the requirement.

Catalog choices. The catalog choices open to business, engineering, nursing, and pharmacy students are described below. In all other divisions, a student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled at the University. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years (seven years for the Bachelor of Architecture) of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2008-2010 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2016 (2017 for the Bachelor of Architecture).

McCombs School of Business. A business student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled at the University. A business honors student who adds a second business major must graduate under the same catalog for both majors.

Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2008-2010 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2016.

Cockrell School of Engineering. An engineering student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the school. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2008-2010 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2016.

Course substitutions in the degree program are permitted only with the approval of the departmental undergraduate adviser and the dean.

School of Nursing. A nursing student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the School of Nursing. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2008-2010 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2016.

College of Pharmacy. A pharmacy student may graduate under the catalog in effect immediately preceding the student's admission to the college or the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the professional curriculum in the college. Whichever catalog they choose, students must complete all degree requirements within seven years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2008-2010 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2017.

1. The Bachelor of Science in Geography and the Environment will not be offered. The University's request for approval was withdrawn after the catalog was published.

2. When the undergraduate catalog was published, final approval was pending to change the name of the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology to "Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health." This change has now been approved.

3. State elementary teacher certification requirements will change in fall, 2009. More information is given in chapter 6.

4. When the undergraduate catalog was published, final approval was pending to change the name of the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology to "Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health." The names of the majors in applied movement science, exercise science, and health promotion were also pending. These changes have now been approved.

5. The program in geosystems engineering and hydrogeology is offered jointly by the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering and the Jackson School of Geosciences.

6. The performance student may major in voice, piano, organ, harpsichord, harp, or one of the orchestral instruments (including euphonium, guitar, and saxophone). The jazz performance student may major in double bass, drum set, guitar, piano, saxophone, trombone, trumpet, or vibraphone.

7. The program in geosystems engineering and hydrogeology is offered jointly by the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering and the Jackson School of Geosciences.

8. When the undergraduate catalog was published, final approval for the major in international relations and global studies was pending. This degree program has now been approved.

9. The student majoring in ethnic studies concentrates in African and African American studies, Asian American studies, or Mexican American studies.

10. The student majoring in Asian cultures and languages specializes in Chinese, Japanese, Hindi/Urdu, Malayalam, Sanskrit, or Tamil.

11. The Bachelor of Science in Geography and the Environment will not be offered. The University's request for approval was withdrawn after the catalog was published.

12. The student majoring in ethnic studies concentrates in African and African American studies, Asian American studies, or Mexican American studies.

13. Each grade point average is the minimum required for graduation with honors, high honors, or highest honors. Because only a certain percentage of the class may receive honors, the average required for each category may be higher.

14. To graduate with University Honors, a student in the McCombs School must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework in residence at the University.

15. To graduate with University Honors, a student in the College of Communication must have completed at the University at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

16. To graduate with University Honors, a student in the Cockrell School must have completed in residence at the University at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree. A student may receive only one bachelor's degree with University Honors from the Cockrell School.

17. To graduate with University Honors, a student in the College of Fine Arts must rank in the indicated percent of students graduating that semester from his or her academic unit (art and art history, music, or theatre and dance) and must have no outstanding delay of grade (symbol X). He or she must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework in residence at the University. A student may receive only one bachelor's degree with University Honors from the College of Fine Arts.

18. This requirement is waived for students in the Accelerated Track for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, a degree program for registered nurses who hold associate's degrees or diplomas in nursing.

Undergraduate Catalog, 2008-2010

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