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Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2009–2010 and 2010–2011; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Nursing: N

380L. Theory Development in Nursing. Introduction to the nature of scientific explanation and inquiry. Critique of theoretical conceptualization in nursing. Examination of strategies for theory development. Analysis of the role of theory in nursing as a practice discipline. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

380M. Historical and Philosophical Study of Nursing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  • Topic 1: Philosophical Aspects of Nursing. Introduction to the analysis of nursing language: defining terms, detecting logical fallacies, analyzing meanings, and recognizing descriptive and normative aspects of judgments.
  • Topic 2: Historical Development of Nursing. In-depth study of the history of nursing, with emphasis on influences on the profession and changes that have occurred within it. Review of the association of nursing with related disciplines, its emergence into institutions of higher learning, organizational structure and hierarchy, changes in educational focus resulting from the preparation of educational leaders, and related topics.
  • Topic 3: Philosophy of Nursing Theory. Advanced seminar in the application of philosophical aspects of nursing theory. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380L.
  • Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science. Philosophical principles and theories that contribute to the ongoing evolution of nursing science. Explores the historical development of nursing as a professional discipline in the context of philosophy and science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 397L (Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature).

381M. Adult Health Nursing. The equivalent of three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  • Topic 1: Theoretical Foundations in Adult Health (Adult Health I). Theoretical underpinnings for research in adult health nursing. Analysis of theories related to person, health, and environment for their applicability to adult health nursing. Nursing 381M (Topic 1) and (Topic 5) may not both be counted.
  • Topic 2: Substantive Areas in Adult Health (Adult Health II). Overview of nursing issues, psychosocial and physiological concepts, and research findings related to health promotion and health care needs of adults. Designed to help students develop the conceptual component of the dissertation research. Nursing 381M (Topic 2) and 397L (Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature) may not both be counted.
  • Topic 3: Research in Adult Health (Adult Health III). Application of methodology and theory development to research studies in adult health, with emphasis on analysis and development of methods for research in adult health nursing. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 381M (Topic 1 or Topic 2) and 397L.
  • Topic 4: Advanced Dissertation Seminar (Adult Health IV). Structured reference group for discussion of theoretical and methodological aspects of the dissertation research process. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380L, 381M (Topic 1), 381M (Topic 2), 381M (Topic 3), and 397K.
  • Topic 5: Theories of Health Behavior. The theoretical underpinnings for research related to health behaviors and health behavior change for individuals, groups, or systems. Nursing 381M (Topic 1) and 381M (Topic 5) may not both be counted. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380M (Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science).

381R. Theoretical Foundations of Aging. Theories in gerontology as applied to nursing practice. Two and one-half lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

381S. Gerontological Nursing. Physiological changes in the elderly, and their implications for nursing practice. Two lecture hours and four and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 381R.

382. Sociocultural Influences on Health. Factors associated with disparities in health status and health care among different social and cultural groups. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

382H. Health Care Delivery. Overview of the health care delivery system in the United States—its definition, characteristics, and components. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

484C. Professional Nursing Foundations. Major premises of professional nursing concepts, with introduction to health promotion and assessment skills for individuals and groups across the life span. Two and one-half lecture hours, three hours of skills laboratory, and three hours of clinical work a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

384D. Conceptual Foundations of Nursing. Life-span, health-related phenomena and concepts essential to effective nursing practice with multiple levels of clients. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484C.

484E. Nursing Responses to Physiological Alterations in Health. Discussion of physiological alterations across the life span and of the nursing measures indicated to restore and maintain health. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484C.

484F. Adult Health Nursing I. Discussion and application of concepts and theories necessary to promote and restore the health of adults with biological problems and related physiological and psychological responses. One and one-half lecture hours, two hours of skills laboratory, and eight hours of clinical work a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484C.

484G. Conceptual Bases of Mental Health Nursing. Current perspectives on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals, families, and groups; clinical application of pertinent nursing care. Two and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484C.

484H. Nursing Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families. Concepts, theories, and processes essential to understanding the health concepts and nursing care of families during the childbearing and childrearing years. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G.

384J. Nursing Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families Practicum. Clinical application of concepts, theories, processes, and skills pertinent to the care of families during the childbearing and childrearing years. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G; and credit or registration for Nursing 484H.

484Q. Public Health Nursing. Public health models used to assess, plan, and evaluate the health of aggregates and communities. Two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G.

484R. Adult Health Nursing II. Discussion and application of advanced concepts and theories to promote and restore health of adults with biological problems and related physiological responses. Two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G.

484S. Integration of Clinical Nursing Knowledge. Integration of nursing knowledge derived from didactic and clinical courses with application in the care of clients across the life span and in a variety of settings. One lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484H, 384J, 484Q, and 484R.

385R. Community Mental Health and Wellness. Concepts, theories, and research on the mental health and wellness of individuals, groups, and families living and working in communities. Principles of preventive health care form a philosophical framework within which students analyze, evaluate, and synthesize the concepts and theories used to promote the health and welfare of people in the community. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

385S. Advanced Theory and Research in Mental Health. Analysis, development, and testing of theories and conceptual models of mental health and illness; examination of relationships among stress, response to traumatic events, and mental health of the individual, family, and groups. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386C. Computers in Nursing. Development of competence in computer use and in the application of computer-based techniques to nursing problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386E. Evidence-Based Practice and Outcomes in Health Care. Theories of evidence-based practice are used to examine complex nursing decision-making activities in clinical and administrative health care settings. Students appraise the health care literature to evaluate the evidence for implementation of change protocols and apply their learning to clinical and administrative decisions about effecting change to deliver patient-centered care. Review of various methods of dissemination of evidence-based practice and outcomes data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For students in the Master of Science in Nursing program, graduate standing and either Nursing 392 and 392E or consent of instructor; for alternate entry students, graduate standing and either Nursing 384D and 392E or consent of instructor.

386F. Budget and Finance in Health Care. Conceptual and practical applications of financial management, cost analyses, and budgeting in the contemporary health care delivery system. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386K. Management of Complex Systems in Nursing. Introduction to major concepts and theories of individual, group, and organizational behavior, and their application to the management of complex social systems in health care organizations. Three class hours a week for one semester. Students in the dual MSN/MBA program may substitute this course for the required business core course, Business Administration 389T. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386M. Administrative Decision Making in Nursing Systems. Theories of nursing, economics, management science, and decision analysis are used to examine strategic and operational decision activities in the administration of nursing systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386P. Practicum in Administrative Decision Making. Guided field experience to examine information management and complex decision problems in the administration of nursing systems. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 386M.

386R. Nursing Systems: Theory and Research. Advanced study of theories and research related to nursing systems of care and patient aggregates within organized settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

386S. Health Care Systems Outcomes. Theoretical and methodological issues related to the study of outcomes of nursing systems of care, including patient, staff, organization, and community health outcomes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

686V. Internship in Administration of Nursing Systems. Analysis and implementation of advanced nursing administrative roles. Synthesis of knowledge and skill in designing, implementing, and evaluating nursing system programs. One lecture hour a week for one semester, and twenty hours of fieldwork a week in a health care agency. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 386K, 386M, and 386P.

387. Best Practices in Clinical Teaching. Designed to prepare nurse educators to manage a group of nursing students in a variety of clinical settings. Applies learning theory to specific teaching strategies designed to prepare students for clinical practice. Explores methods for evaluating learning outcomes. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 387C or consent of instructor.

387C. Conceptual Foundations of Nursing Education. Designed to introduce the student to the essential elements of nursing education. Critical elements include the theoretical bases of teaching and learning, curriculum development, and assessment and evaluation strategies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

287P, 387P, 487P, 587P, 687P. Practicum in Nursing Education. Designed to help the student prepare for a variety of roles in nursing education based on individual professional experience and goals. Practice teaching in clinical settings, simulation laboratories, and distant and live classrooms. Students teach patients, nursing staff members, or students individually or as groups. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and credit or registration for Nursing 387, 387C, or 388, or consent of instructor.

388. Strategies of Teaching in Nursing. Designed to prepare nurse educators across a spectrum of settings, including patient education, staff development, and college teaching. Explores the application of learning theory to a variety of teaching strategies and methods of evaluating processes and outcomes. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 387C or consent of instructor.

389C. Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health: Role Dimensions. Survey of the underlying values and the central and core competencies of the clinical nurse specialist in adult health across the spheres of influence (patient, nursing practice, organization/system). Application of theory and research to advanced practice. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 392Q or consent of instructor.

389D. Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health: Health Promotion and Illness Prevention. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessments and interventions for selected adult clients. Two and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 389C, 392E, and 396J.

589E. Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health: Chronic Illness. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, and environmental concepts and testing of assessment and interventions for selected adult health nursing clients. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 389C, 389D, 489F, 392E, 395C, 396C, and 396J.

389F, 489F. Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health: Acute Care. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts; testing of assessments and interventions for selected adult nursing clients. For 389F, two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 489F, two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and either consent of instructor or the following: Nursing 389C, 396C, and 396J and credit or registration for Nursing 389D, 392E, and 395C.

689G. Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health: Practicum. Guided field experience to apply the clinical nurse specialist practice model in adult populations. Extensive clinical experience to acquire skills in the roles of the clinical nurse specialist. Two lecture hours and sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 589E, 392, 392P, and 392Q.

489H. Diagnosis and Management of Adult Health Problems. Theoretical and clinical content for management of health problems of adult clients. Integration and application of skills and knowledge gained in previous adult health clinical nurse specialist coursework for adult patients in the acute or chronic setting. Pattern recognition, critical thinking, analysis, diagnostic testing, differential diagnosis, and medical management of common adult health problems. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 389C, 389D, 589E, 489F, 396C, and 396J; credit or registration for Nursing 689G; credit or registration for Nursing 395C or the equivalent; completion of all core courses in the adult health concentration; and consent of instructor.

389J. Adult Health Nursing: Health without Illness. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessment and interventions for selected adult health nursing clients. Focus on dynamics of health without illness and related advanced nursing roles. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

389K. Adult Health Nursing: Illness within Health. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessment and interventions for selected adult health nursing clients. Focus on dynamics of illness within health and related advanced nursing roles. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 389J, 392E, and 396C.

389L. Adult Health Nursing: Health within Illness. Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessment and interventions for selected adult health nursing clients. Focus on dynamics of health within illness and related advanced nursing roles. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 389J, 392E, and 396C.

390C. Health Promotion of High-Risk Populations. Advanced study of health promotion/illness prevention theories and research, with a focus on selected high-risk populations in the community. Emphasis on analyzing community risk factors, research and theory related to health promotion and illness prevention as applied to individuals, families, aggregates, and organizations, and research related to health outcomes for selected population groups, nationally and internationally. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

390D. Public Health in a Global Context. Advanced study of theory and research related to public health within a global context. Examines relationships among public health needs and resources, health services, health policy, law, and population health indices. Emphasis is on developing both the knowledge fundamental to population-based health and the research base for optimizing public health through community action. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

391D. Advanced Public Health Nursing: Community and Population Assessment. Theories and methods to assess populations, communities, and aggregates. Students apply appropriate strategies to assess the strengths and needs of a selected population or community and make public health nursing diagnoses of populations or communities as the foundation for planning public health programs for health promotion and disease prevention. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 391H.

391E. Public Health Assurance and Policy. Processes involved in the implementation and evaluation of a population-focused health promotion program based on community data sets and previously collected data; and policy recommendations related to the program. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 391D.

391F. Epidemiology in Public Health. A theoretical framework for applied public health epidemiology, including the importance of high-quality data, measures of morbidity and mortality in a population, epidemiological investigations, and the use of epidemiological study designs. Two and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

391G. Public Health Program Development. Focus on analyzing and critiquing health promotion and disease prevention initiatives, and obtaining and using relevant community and population-level health data for developing a multilevel health promotion and disease prevention initiative. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 391D or consent of instructor.

391H. Theories and Critical Issues in Public Health. Major concepts and theories that guide public health practice for nurses and other professionals; local, national, and global issues and trends that shape public health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

691P. Advanced Public Health Nursing Practice. Synthesis of public health nursing knowledge and skills in advanced practice. The multifaceted roles involved in advanced public health nursing practice, with emphasis on the ability to articulate one’s professional roles based on theory and practice. One lecture hour and twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 391D and 391E.

392. Nursing Phenomena of Concern. The major phenomena underlying research and advanced practice in nursing. Concepts derived from these phenomena address the wide range of health, health concerns, and populations that nurses treat. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

392E. Research Methods. Designed to prepare the student to use and implement nursing research in clinical practice settings. Students develop basic research skills needed to critique, plan, and conduct nursing research. Several types of research are introduced and their methodologies examined. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

392J. The Art and Science of Family Health. Open to all graduate students with consent of instructor. Theoretical foundations for advanced practice in nursing and other disciplines concerned with family health: family, parent, and child health and development theories; conceptual basis for understanding the context in which parent and child health and illness exist; interdisciplinary concepts and theoretical perspectives. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in nursing, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

592K. Parent-Child Nursing I: Childbearing Families. Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with childbearing families, considered from biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives. Introduction to concepts related to role development as an advanced practice nurse, with emphasis on the promotion of wellness and prevention of illness in pregnant women and their newborns within the context of their families. Students apply these concepts in providing nursing care to childbearing families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three class hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 396C and 396J, and credit or registration for Nursing 395C.

592L. Parent-Child Nursing II: Childrearing Families. Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with childbearing families, considered from biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives. Legal, ethical, and practice issues affecting the advanced practice nurse. Emphasis on promotion of wellness and prevention of illness in children within the context of their families. Students apply concepts in providing nursing care to childrearing families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 592K.

392M. Clinical Project in Parent-Child Nursing. Supervised, individual clinical project. One lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

392P. Health Systems: Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. Open to all University graduate students. Exploration of multilevel health care policy implementation, program development, and outcome evaluation. Focus on the application of policies from macro-level to micro-level systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 392E or the equivalent.

392Q. Advanced Psychosocial Nursing: Culture, Ethics, and Therapeutic Communication. Current theoretical, research, ethical, and cultural perspectives pertinent to the application of selected advanced psychosocial nursing strategies with diverse populations of individuals, groups, and families. Two and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

492S. Advanced Practicum in Parent-Child Nursing. Culminating preceptorship experience: each student identifies his or her objectives for refining the role of the advanced practice nurse and selects the clinical setting and target population(s) that best support those objectives. One lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 592U.

392T. Advanced Assessment in Parent-Child Nursing. Advanced nursing assessment strategies for childbearing and childrearing families. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

592U. Parent-Child Nursing III: At-Risk Families. Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with at-risk families during the childbearing years. Legal, ethical, and practice issues affecting the advanced practice nurse. Emphasis is on assessment and intervention with pregnant women and children with health problems that have a social and biophysical etiology. Students apply concepts in providing nursing care to at-risk families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 592L.

192V, 392V. Advanced Pediatric Pathophysiology. Pathophysiology unique to the growth and development of newborns, infants, children, and adolescents. Embryology, genetics, adaptation to extrauterine life, congenital anomalies, immunology, and the physiology and pathophysiology of puberty. Pathophysiology is studied from a developmental perspective, to encourage students’ in-depth understanding of functional and dysfunctional integration of organ systems in the developing human; the goal is to give students a foundation for assessing and intervening with a variety of childhood health conditions based on pathophysiological changes. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

492W. Advanced Practicum in Child Health. Prominent concepts of biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives, and the clinical basis for master’s-level nursing practice with children and their families. Students use advanced concepts and theories in working with faculty members and preceptors in hospitals, clinics, schools, or homes. Two lecture hours and eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 392V, 394C, and 396T.

393. Parents, Children, and Family Life. Study of theories on parents, children, and family life; critical review of major research findings, with emphasis on implications for further research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

393M. Maternal/Parent-Child Nursing. Class and/or laboratory hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  • Topic 1: Seminar in Parenthood and Family Life. Advanced seminar on theory and research related to parenthood and family life.
  • Topic 3: Work and Family: Psychological and Social Aspects of Multiple Roles. Advanced seminar focusing on occupational and parental roles and the resulting strains and health consequences.
  • Topic 4: Predictive and Interventive Research with Families. Advanced seminar reviewing, critiquing, and applying predictive and interventive research studies.

293P. Pediatric Diagnostic Reasoning and Advanced Invasive Skills. Interpretation of laboratory and diagnostic testing; and the development of diagnostic and psychomotor skills needed to care for acute or critically ill neonatal and pediatric patients. One and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, credit or registration for Nursing 394C or the equivalent, and credit or registration for Nursing 392V or the equivalent.

393Q. Advanced Neonatal Nursing I. Assessment and implementation of advanced nursing care of the high-risk preterm neonate. Development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making; provision of care within a family-centered and developmentally supportive context. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, credit or registration for Nursing 293P and 395D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293R, and consent of instructor.

293R. Advanced Neonatal Nursing I—Clinic. Assessment and implementation of advanced nursing care of the high-risk preterm neonate. Development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making; provision of care within a family-centered and developmentally supportive context. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393Q, and consent of instructor.

393S. Advanced Neonatal Nursing II. Knowledge and skills needed to recognize and respond to emerging crises and organ system dysfunction or failure in full-term neonates with complex acute, critical, or chronic health conditions. Stabilizing the patient, minimizing complications, restoring maximum health potential through risk reduction, and providing family-centered care. Current research and evidence, theoretical models, and philosophies of care. Continued development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393Q and 293R, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293T, and consent of instructor.

293T. Advanced Neonatal Nursing II—Clinic. Continued development of advanced clinical skills in the management of high-risk neonates. Students incorporate nursing theory, current research and evidence, and complex skills into the care of full-term neonates with acute, critical, or chronic health conditions. Integration, under supervision of faculty members and preceptors, of the neonatal nurse practitioner role in the care of high-risk neonates in neonatal intensive care, labor and delivery, and interhospital and intrahospital transport. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393S, and consent of instructor.

393U. Advanced Neonatal Nursing III. Transition to home care and follow-up care for high-risk neonates and infants and their families. Synthesis of current research and evidence and theoretical concepts in nursing and the social and behavioral sciences that are relevant to care from admission to discharge. Continued development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making. Advanced role development; legal, political, and ethical issues affecting nurse practitioner practice. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393S and 293T, and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293V.

293V. Advanced Neonatal Nursing III—Clinic. Continued development of advanced clinical skills in the management of high-risk neonates and infants. Under the supervision of faculty members and preceptors, students incorporate nursing theory, current research and evidence, and complex skills into the care of neonates and infants from hospital admission to discharge to follow-up care in the community. Integration of knowledge and skills needed to care effectively and efficiently for neonates and infants whose life processes are assisted by or dependent on technological devices. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393U, and consent of instructor.

493W. Advanced Neonatal Nursing Practicum. Concentrated and supervised application of knowledge and skills gained in previous courses to the management of high-risk neonates and infants. Evaluation of patients presenting with complex health problems and of their families; development of comprehensive evidence-based management plans under the supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Sixteen clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393U and 293V, and consent of instructor.

194, 294, 394, 494. Independent Study in Nursing. Detailed or in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student and instructor. Hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics are offered on the credit/no credit basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

394C. Advanced Pediatric Health and Developmental Assessment. Advanced developmental and health assessment of children (newborn through adolescent). Emphasis is on theories and skills applicable to the assessment of children. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 192V and 396C, and consent of instructor.

294D. Primary Health Care of the Adolescent. Study of health promotion, anticipatory guidance, prevention of illness, and the assessment and management of illnesses commonly affecting adolescents. Adolescent health is discussed in a developmental context. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 394C or 396J, and consent of instructor.

394E. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts I. Study of health promotion, anticipatory guidance, prevention of illness, and the assessment and management of acute illnesses commonly affecting children. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 394C, 395D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394F, and consent of instructor.

394F. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts I Clinic. Clinical experience in primary care settings, focusing on health promotion and management of well-child care and acute illnesses commonly encountered in children. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 395D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394E, and consent of instructor.

294J. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts III. Primary care management of complex conditions in children. Additional emphasis on advanced role development of the pediatric nurse practitioner. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 394E and 394F, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 494K, and consent of instructor.

494K. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts III Clinic. Pediatric primary health care practicum in the advanced nursing management of the health of infants, children, and adolescents. Sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 396U and 396V, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 294J, and consent of instructor.

394L. Advanced Physiologic and Psychosocial Concepts in Maternity Nursing. Advanced concepts related to the physiological and psychosocial changes resulting from childbearing. Development of skill in interpreting relevant biopsychosocial data. Theories and research related to the biopsychosocial concepts, family, parenting, preconception, systems of care, and cultural perspectives on reproductive health promotion. Serves as a foundation for providing nursing care to the maternal-newborn dyad in the family context. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396C.

394M. Health Promotion in Maternity Nursing. Analysis of concepts related to health promotion, illness prevention, health disparities, and systems of care both during and between pregnancies. Students apply theoretical principles and research evidence while caring for women and newborns in a variety of settings under faculty and preceptor supervision. Students use data and resources to identify gaps and opportunities in maternity care. Presentation of theory and practice of maternity care, to prepare students as clinicians, researchers, educators, and administrators in fertility, pregnancy, birth, newborn care, lactation, and parenting. Two lecture hours and four clinical practicum hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 394L and 396C.

394N. High-Risk Maternity Nursing. Significant biopsychosocial concepts that serve as a basis for nursing practice in high-risk maternity care; knowledge needed to identify common maternity complications; assessment and planning of evidence-based maternity care within the family context. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 394M.

394P. Advanced Practicum in Maternity Nursing. Guided field experience in which the student applies advanced nursing concepts in a selected area of maternity care. Under the direction of a clinical mentor, the student obtains extensive clinical experience to integrate skills relevant to his or her selected professional role. One lecture hour and eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 394M, and credit or registration for Nursing 394N.

195, 295, 395, 495, 595, 695. Topics in Nursing. Areas of special interest. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Some topics also require consent of instructor; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

  • Topic 2: Community Programs Evaluation.

395C. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Application of pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic principles to drug therapy management in family primary care nursing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

395D. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. The study of pediatric pharmacotherapeutics, with emphasis on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, administration, and education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

396C. Advanced Pathophysiology. Pathophysiologic concepts from the cellular level through major body systems and across the life span. Etiological, pathogenic, and presenting patterns. Fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology. Students are expected to develop an understanding of nursing and medical interventions for common health problems and the ability to apply and design interventions based on pathophysiologic changes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 396C and Pharmacy 395D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

396J. Advanced Health Assessment. Advanced knowledge and skills involved in the assessment of individuals throughout the life span, within the context of the family, to determine their health status. Two lecture hours, three laboratory hours, and one hour of skills laboratory a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the advanced practice specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 396C, and consent of instructor.

196K, 296K. Advanced Health Assessment Clinic. Application of health assessment concepts and skills under the supervision of faculty and clinical preceptors in the clinical area. Performance of systematic health assessments of adults leading to the identification of normal and abnormal findings and the development of an initial health status list. Four or eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the advanced practice specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 396C and 396J, and consent of instructor.

396L. Primary Health Care Concepts I. Theoretical and clinical knowledge needed for advanced nursing management within the context of the family and the community of individuals who are essentially well or who have minor health problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396J and 296K; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196M, 296M, or 396M; and consent of instructor.

196M, 296M, 396M. Primary Health Care Concepts I Clinic. Supervised experience in the nursing management of infants, children, and/or advanced adults and families who are well or who have common acute health problems. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396C, 396J, and 296K; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396L; and consent of instructor.

396N. Primary Health Care Concepts II. Theoretical and clinical knowledge needed for the management of complex and chronic health problems of individuals and families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396L and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196P, 296P, or 396P; and consent of instructor.

196P, 296P, 396P. Primary Health Care Concepts II Clinic. Supervised experience in the nursing management of infants, children, adults, and families who have complex or chronic health problems. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 391D, 396L, and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396N; and consent of instructor.

396Q. Primary Health Care Concepts III. Synthesis of concepts and theories from nursing, social sciences, and biological sciences that are related to primary health care management of members of families and communities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 391E; either Nursing 396N and 396P or 396U and 396V; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196R, 296R, 396R, or 496R; and consent of instructor.

196R, 296R, 396R, 496R. Primary Health Care Concepts III Clinic. Advanced supervised experience as a direct primary health care giver in family practice clinical settings. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 391E; either Nursing 396N and 396P or 396U and 396V; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396Q; and consent of instructor.

196S. Special Project in Advanced Practice. Development of a special project in an area of research, policy, or clinical issues relevant to advanced practice. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 396L and 396M, and consent of instructor.

396T. Ecological Approaches to Child Health. The ecological approach to understanding individual, parental, family, and societal determinants of children’s health. Students gain knowledge of developmental and family theories and use epidemiological principles to comprehend the complex dimensions and related conceptual factors that contribute to the health and well-being of children within families. Theoretical foundations for graduate students interested in health promotion and risk reduction for children and families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

396U. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts II. Theoretical knowledge relevant to the management of complex and chronic primary health care problems from infancy through adolescence. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner or the parent/child nursing specialization; Nursing 396C, 396L, and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196V, 296V, or 396V; and consent of instructor.

196V, 296V, 396V. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts II Clinic. Clinical practice in the management of complex or chronic health problems of infants, children, and adolescents. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner or the parent/child nursing specialization; Nursing 396C, 396L, and 396M; and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396U.

397K. Advanced Research in Nursing. Nursing science methods for developing and testing theoretical formulations: experimental, descriptive, qualitative, and historical designs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional computer laboratory hours to be arranged. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 392E, and consent of instructor.

397L. Nursing Research Methods. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional computer laboratory hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 397K, and consent of instructor.

  • Topic 1: Analysis and Interpretation of Data. Critiquing, interpreting, disseminating, and using research findings.
  • Topic 2: Instrumentation and Measurement. Theoretical, methodological, and procedural aspects of measurement: norm-referenced and criterion-referenced measurement; data management and instrumentation.
  • Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods. Theoretical approach to basic statistical and measurement concepts and their importance to research in health-related areas.
  • Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature. Designed to assist the novice researcher in conducting a systematic and critical review of the literature in a substantial area of health-related scholarship. Nursing 381M (Topic 2: Substantive Areas in Adult Health [Adult Health II]) and 397L (Topic 4) may not both be counted.
  • Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis. Focuses on quantitative research design, methods, and analysis used in health care research. Includes descriptive, correlational, and experimental designs; related methods of analysis using statistical software; interpretation of data; and critique of research reports. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 397L (Topic 3) or consent of instructor.

397M. Qualitative Research. Introduction to the theoretical and methodological aspects of qualitative research methods. Qualitative research approaches from a variety of disciplines and philosophical traditions, with emphasis on the application of research designs and data collection and analysis techniques to nursing studies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and completion of two doctoral-level research courses or consent of instructor.

197P, 297P. Nursing Research Practicum. Guided experience in conceptual and methodological aspects of research: data management and analysis; critique and interpretation; instrumentation; and measurement. Four or eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 397K.

397Q. Research Practicum I. Examines essential aspects of the responsible conduct of research and beginning skills needed to initiate a research program. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 397L (Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods), or credit or registration for Nursing 397L (Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis), or consent of instructor.

397R. Research Practicum II. Examines essential procedural aspects of conducting health-related research. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 397L (Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods), 397L (Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis), or consent of instructor; and credit or registration for Nursing 380M (Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science), 382, or consent of instructor.

397S. Research Practicum III. Focuses on essential skills needed to develop a research proposal and plan an independent research program. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 397M and 397R.

698. Thesis. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in nursing and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Nursing 698A.

399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of core doctoral courses and admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Nursing 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Graduate Catalog, 2009-2011

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