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Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment—Instructional Assessment and Evaluation

The Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment's Instructional Assessment and Evaluation Group (IAE) coordinates University testing programs, including examinations for course credit and placement, and serves as a test center for many examinations offered worldwide, including the College Level Examination Program, the Law School Admission Test, the Miller Analogies Test, and the Praxis Series (Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers). Information about academic placement and credit by examination as well as worldwide test programs is available at the DIIA Web site, at the IAE office at 2616 Wichita Street, or by mail from The University of Texas at Austin, DIIA-IAE, P O Box 7246, Austin TX 78713-7246; (512) 232-2662, fax (512) 471-3509. When writing for information, please include a daytime telephone number.

In addition to administering testing programs, IAE conducts studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the University in achieving the goals of its educational programs. The group assists faculty members with the construction, processing, and analysis of tests and other measuring instruments, with system design and data processing services involving automatic document scanning, and with related data processing activities. By means of Course-Instructor Surveys, IAE enables faculty members to obtain student opinions of their courses and their teaching methods.

Course Placement and Credit by Examination

Students at the University may earn credit and determine course placement by examination. Some exams are required for enrollment in certain courses, while others are optional; most serve as a basis for course credit.

Any current, former, or prospective University student may attempt to earn credit by exam for any required or elective undergraduate course, provided the student has neither passed nor failed that course at the University or at any other collegiate institution. (There is one exception to this policy: When a student has received transfer credit for a course with fewer semester hours than the corresponding University course carries, the student may earn credit by exam for the University course, but only with the symbol CR.) Additional eligibility requirements may be established by the academic department awarding credit, with the approval of the dean of the college or school. Information about additional requirements is available from IAE and from the academic department.

A student enrolled in college-level courses in the Division of Continuing and Innovative Education may attempt to earn credit by exam under the same rules as students currently or formerly enrolled in resident credit courses at the University. The student must complete at least one college-level course before credit by exam can be awarded.

Credit earned by examination satisfies degree requirements in the same way as credit earned by passing a course, except that it does not count as credit earned in residence. Credit earned by examination does not jeopardize eligibility for scholarships that require freshman standing. The student's official transcript does not reflect unsuccessful attempts to earn credit by examination.

A student's academic dean may approve an exception to the course placement and credit by exam policies for compelling academic reasons. If the exception involves the student's eligibility to be tested or to receive credit by exam in a particular course, the exception must also be approved by the department in which the course is offered.

The faculties of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences encourage students enrolled in those colleges to earn credit by exam in as many subjects as possible, including the student's major.

All tests administered at the University for course placement and credit by exam require a fee. Information, including the testing schedule, eligibility requirements, test descriptions, sample questions, and the amount of test fees (including a $15 nonrefundable test registration fee), is available at the DIIA Web site. Information may also be obtained by sending the name and address to which the information should be mailed and two first-class postage stamps for each handout requested to The University of Texas at Austin, DIIA-IAE, P O Box 7246, Austin TX 78713-7246. The academic subject, specific test, and other topics about which information is needed should be stated. IAE is located at 2616 Wichita Street. The telephone number is (512) 232-2662, fax (512) 471-3509.

Claiming credit. Credit by exam does not become part of the student's official academic record until the student claims the credit by asking IAE to report it to the registrar's office. Credit must be claimed within ten years of the test administration date. It may be claimed only through the IAE Web site. [8] A fee is assessed for each report. The Web site gives a full explanation on how to petition and pay for credit by examination.

Although prospective students may take examinations to establish their eligibility to receive credit, credit is awarded only to officially enrolled students and former students. Enrollment on the twelfth class day of a semester or the fourth class day of a summer term constitutes official enrollment.

In deciding whether to claim credit by exam, students should consider the impact of the credit on their eligibility for a tuition rebate; the possibility that they will charged additional tuition if they have excess credit; and the possibility that they will be ineligible for Texas B-On-Time loan forgiveness if they have excess credit.

Letter grades. University policy on the award of letter grades for credit by exam was changed in the fall semester 2006. In either of the following cases, claiming credit by exam with the symbol CR does not affect the number of semester hours for which a student may enroll on the pass/fail basis.

Scores received by September 15, 2006. If IAE received a test score for a student enrolled on or before September 15, 2006, the student may choose to claim the credit either with a letter grade or with the symbol CR (credit). The student must advise IAE whether to report a letter grade or the symbol CR to the registrar; after the credit has been reported, this choice may not be changed. Credit is awarded only if the student has earned a grade of C, B, or A. Credit accepted with a letter grade is used in calculating the student's grade point average.

Scores received after September 15, 2006. If IAE receives a test score after September 15, 2006, the student may claim the credit only with the symbol CR, not with a letter grade. Credit recorded with the symbol CR is not used in calculating the student's grade point average.

Examinations required or recommended for course placement. Most of the tests mentioned below are given on the University campus immediately before each semester and the first summer term, during most summer orientation sessions, and at least once each fall and spring semester. The School of Journalism Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation Test and the Word Processing Test are given on campus on an ongoing basis. The SAT Reasoning Test and the ACT Writing Test are administered at various sites nationwide.

  1. Placement in rhetoric and writing. Before enrolling in Rhetoric and Writing 306, a student must have a score on the ACT Writing Test or the writing section of the SAT Reasoning Test, since the score is required for placement at the appropriate level in lower-division rhetoric and writing courses. A student who earns a satisfactory score on either test is eligible to receive credit for Rhetoric and Writing 306. A score on the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in English Language and Composition or transfer credit for Rhetoric and Writing 306 may also be used for credit and placement. Additional information is available from IAE.

    International students whose native language is not English must submit satisfactory scores on the Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT) for admission to a lower-division rhetoric and writing course.

  2. Placement in languages. Students with transfer credit in a foreign language are strongly encouraged to take the placement test before enrolling in further coursework in that language; however, in most languages, students with transfer credit are not required to take the placement test.

    Students without transfer credit but with knowledge of American Sign Language or a foreign language, however acquired, must take the placement test before enrolling in a course in that language. The only exception to this policy is that students who have taken Spanish in high school may enroll in beginning Spanish without taking the placement test. The student must take the placement test before enrolling in any course beyond Spanish 508K.

    Foreign language placement tests serve not only to determine the level of work appropriate for students but also as the basis for credit by exam, which normally may be earned in as many as four lower-division courses. Credit by exam may be used to absolve a high school unit deficiency or to fulfill degree requirements. Credit in a language that exceeds degree requirements often may be used as elective credit.

    For course placement and credit by examination, the University uses the University of Wisconsin College-Level Placement Tests in French and in Spanish; the SAT Subject Test in German with Listening plus UT Austin supplemental items; the SAT Subject Test in Korean with Listening plus UT Austin supplemental essay; and UT Austin Tests for Credit in Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Russian, and Vietnamese. Information about the tests and sample questions may be obtained from the IAE office and at the DIIA Web site.

    Students who have taken either a College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in French, German, or Spanish or any International Baccalaureate (IB) Examination in a foreign language do not need to take the corresponding required placement test, because the AP or IB examination results can be used for placement. For foreign language tests not listed in this section, students should contact IAE for information.

  3. Placement in chemistry. The UT Austin Test for Credit in Chemistry 301 is required of students who are seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry or the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, who studied chemistry in high school, and who do not have credit for Chemistry 301 or the equivalent. The test is recommended for physics, biomedical engineering, and other engineering majors who have sufficient background. Information about the chemistry test, including eligibility requirements and sample questions, is available from the IAE office and at the DIIA Web site.
  4. Placement in mathematics. Most entry-level mathematics courses have as a prerequisite either a minimum score on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics Level 1 or credit with a minimum grade for a specified college-level mathematics course. Course prerequisites are given in the Undergraduate Catalog. Although the Level 1 test is preferred, a student may present a score on the Level 2 test. These tests serve as a basis for credit by examination for Mathematics 305G. Information and registration forms are available from the College Board, from most high schools, and from IAE.
  5. Prerequisite for journalism. Students must have satisfactory scores on the School of Journalism Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation Test and Word Processing Test in order to register for Journalism 315 and most upper-division journalism courses. Students with transfer credit for Journalism 315 must have satisfactory scores on both tests prior to enrolling in more advanced journalism courses at the University. A student who believes he or she should be exempted from either test should contact the School of Journalism. Students may take the tests a maximum of three times. The tests do not serve as a basis for course credit.
  6. Computer Proficiency Test for business students. In order to register for Management Information Systems 301, the business core courses, and some business electives, students must take the Computer Proficiency Test. Students with transfer credit for Management Information Systems 301 or the equivalent are not required to take the test.

Optional examinations. The following optional tests serve as bases for credit by examination at the University.

  1. UT Austin tests for credit in biology, chemistry, computer sciences, government, Hindi, history, Latin, physics, and Polish. Eligible students can earn credit for specified courses in these fields. Descriptions of the tests and test schedules are available from the IAE office and at the DIIA Web site.
  2. College Board SAT Subject Tests. In addition to the required Mathematics Level 1 or Level 2 Test, the University grants credit on the basis of the SAT Subject Tests in German with Listening, Korean with Listening, and Physics.
  3. College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations. Credit is granted to students who have earned satisfactory scores on the College Board Advanced Placement Examinations in art (art history and studio art), biology, chemistry, computer science, English, European history, French, German, human geography, Latin, macroeconomics, mathematics, microeconomics, music theory, physics, psychology, Spanish, statistics, United States government and politics, United States history, and world history. The AP Examination in government and politics is supplemented with test items on Texas government; these additional items are administered only at the University. Advanced Placement Examinations are different from the SAT Subject Tests and are offered only once each year, in May, at specific high schools across the country. More information about AP Examinations is published by the College Board.
  4. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). The CLEP examinations in American government, American literature, calculus, college algebra, English literature, principles of macroeconomics, principles of microeconomics, introductory psychology, and introductory sociology are used as bases for credit by examination. The tests in American government, American literature, English literature, and college algebra are supplemented with items prepared by University faculty members; these items are available only on the University campus. Information about locally prepared items may be obtained from IAE. All CLEP examinations used by the University as a basis for credit by exam are given on campus on an ongoing basis. The University also serves as a national testing center for other CLEP examinations.
  5. International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher-Level Examinations. Credit is granted by the University to students who earn satisfactory scores on the IB Higher-Level Examinations in Arabic, biology, chemistry, Chinese, history (concentrations in Africa, the Americas, Europe, and Islamic history), Italian, Japanese, Korean, mathematics, Norwegian, philosophy, physics, Portuguese, psychology, Russian, social and cultural anthropology, Spanish, Swedish, and visual arts.
  6. International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. In accordance with section 51.968 of the Texas Education Code, credit by exam is awarded as described below to students who have earned an IB diploma and who are admitted as freshmen for the academic year 2006–2007 or later.
    1. All students who submit satisfactory scores on the IB Higher-Level (HL) Examinations listed in item 5 above will continue to receive credit by exam, whether or not they have also earned the IB diploma.
    2. Students who submit scores of 4 or higher on HL exams in the subjects listed in item 5 or in other IB subjects will receive credit by exam if they have also earned the IB diploma.
    3. Students who submit scores of 4 or higher on IB Standard Level (SL) Examinations will receive credit by exam if they have also earned the IB diploma.

    Students who have earned an IB diploma will be awarded credit based on scores of 4 or higher on IB HL and SL examinations as described by Texas Education Code section 51.968. Before claiming the credit, students should consider the impact of these hours on their eligibility for a tuition rebate; the possibility that they will charged additional tuition if they have excess credit; and the possibility that they will be ineligible for Texas B-On-Time loan forgiveness if they have excess credit. Each student is strongly encouraged to discuss these issues with an academic adviser in his or her college before claiming credit. The student and adviser should also discuss the student's academic preparation for sequent courses based on IB test score.

  7. Other credit by examination. With the approval of the appropriate academic dean and department chair or program director, a student may take an examination in any undergraduate course offered by the University for which he or she has reason to feel qualified. A candidate may apply to take course examinations only after registering as a student at the University. Exams are given at the convenience of the administering department. A student who earns a satisfactory score will receive credit for the course.

    Application forms for course exams are available at the IAE office. A student who intends to apply for an exam over a first-year course should obtain a course outline from the department that offers the course; only students who have the equivalent in knowledge or training of that presented in the outline should apply for the exam.

Adding and Dropping Courses

Procedures for adding and dropping courses are given in the Course Schedule. Each student is responsible for properly initiating and completing adds and drops. Information about fee adjustments resulting from adds and drops is given in chapter 3.

Adding Courses

The addition of a course is governed by the following requirements: (1) the student must obtain all required approvals; (2) the student must be eligible to take the course, and there must be space available in the course; and (3) the student must remain in conformity with the quantity of work rule.

Subject to these requirements, a registered student may add a course through the twelfth class day of a long-session semester or the fourth class day of a summer term. Through the fourth class day of the semester or the second class day of the summer term, the approval of the chair of the department offering the course may be required; after these dates, the approval of the chair is required. In some colleges and schools, the approval of the student's adviser and dean are also required. The student must consult the regulations of his or her college or school before adding a course.

Although a college or school may permit the addition of courses through the twelfth class day of the semester or the fourth class day of a summer term, the student is expected to be settled in his or her courses by the fourth class day of the semester or the second class day of the summer term. After the twelfth class day of a semester or the fourth class day of a summer term, the student may add a course only in rare and extenuating circumstances as approved by the student's dean and the chair of the department offering the course.

Dropping Courses: Rules for Undergraduate Students [9]

Subject to the conditions below, an undergraduate may drop a course through the midsemester deadline in a long-session semester or the last class day in a summer term; these dates and the dates of other deadlines discussed below are given in the academic calendar. The student must remain in conformity with the quantity of work rule and must obtain all required approvals.

International students must obtain written permission from the International Office, in addition to other required approvals, to drop a course.

On the recommendation of the instructor, and with the approval of the student's academic dean, a student may be required to drop a course at any time because of neglect or for lack of preparation.

Dropping a course through the twelfth class day. The following rules apply from the first class day through the twelfth class day of a long-session semester and from the first class day through the fourth class day of a summer term:

To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of the chair of the department offering the course. In some colleges and schools, the student must also have the approval of his or her adviser and dean; each student must consult the regulations of his or her college or school. If the student is allowed to drop the course, the course is deleted from his or her academic record.

Normally, the approval of the chair of the department during this period is routine, and the student may initiate the drop through the registration system. However, in some circumstances, a department may disapprove requests to drop certain courses. If a drop request is not accepted by the registration system, the student should consult the department that offers the course for more information.

Dropping a course through the fourth week of classes. The following rules apply from the thirteenth class day through the twentieth class day of a long-session semester and from the fifth class day through the tenth class day of a summer term:

To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of his or her dean. In some colleges and schools, the approval of the student's adviser is also required; each student must consult the regulations of his or her college or school. If the student is allowed to drop the course, the symbol Q appears on his or her academic record to indicate a drop without academic penalty.

Dropping a course after the fourth week of classes. The following rules apply from the twenty-first class day through the midsemester deadline in a long-session semester and from the eleventh class day through the last class day of a summer term:

To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of the instructor, the student's adviser, and the student's dean. If the instructor approves the drop, he or she will assign the symbol Q or a grade of F. The symbol Q indicates that the student has a grade of at least C in the course, that no final grade has yet been assigned, or that no academic penalty is in order because of the student's performance and the nature of the course. In compelling circumstances, the student's dean may assign the symbol Q for nonacademic reasons.

Dropping a course after midsemester. After the midsemester deadline for dropping courses in a long-session semester, an undergraduate may not drop a course except with the approval of his or her dean, and then only for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons.

Dropping Courses: Rules for Graduate Students

With the required approvals, a graduate student may drop a course through the last class day of the semester or summer term; after the twelfth class day of the semester or the fourth class day of the summer term, the graduate dean's approval is also required. If the student drops the course by the twelfth class day of the semester or the fourth class day of the summer term, the course is deleted from the student's academic record.

If the student drops the course from the thirteenth through the twentieth class day of the long-session semester or from the fifth through the tenth class day of the summer term, the symbol Q appears on his or her academic record to indicate a drop without academic penalty. After these dates, if the student is registered on the letter-grade basis, the course instructor assigns the symbol Q or a grade of F; if the student is registered on the credit/no credit basis, the symbol NC is recorded.

A student who is in warning status for failing to maintain a 3.00 grade point average may not drop a course without the recommendation of his or her graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean.

International students, in addition to obtaining the required approvals, must be advised by the International Office before dropping a course if their remaining course load will be fewer than nine hours.

Students appointed as graduate student academic employees may not reduce their course load to fewer than nine hours during a long-session semester or fewer than three hours in a summer session (in any combination of summer-session terms) without the written recommendation of the graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean.

Changing Registration to or from the Pass/Fail Basis or the Credit/No Credit Basis

Some courses must be taken for a letter grade; others must be taken on the pass/fail or credit/no credit basis. These requirements are given in catalogs and the Course Schedule. If registration in a course is not restricted to a specific grading basis, the student may choose to register either for a letter grade or for credit.

An undergraduate student may change registration in a class from the pass/fail basis to the letter-grade basis or from the letter-grade basis to the pass/fail basis until the deadline given in the academic calendar. The basis of registration for a course may be changed only once.

A graduate student may change registration in a class from the credit/no credit basis to the letter-grade basis or from the letter-grade basis to the credit/no credit basis until the deadline given in the academic calendar.

Withdrawal

A student who wishes to withdraw from the University after completing registration for a semester or summer session must secure the dean's approval. A student who is a minor must present a written statement from a parent, guardian, or sponsor indicating that the responsible person knows of the student's intent to withdraw. In addition, international students must have permission from the International Office to withdraw. The dean's permit to withdraw must be submitted to the registrar, where the student may request a refund of fees in accordance with University policy. No fees will be repaid to anyone other than the payer, except on the payer's written order.

After the last day for withdrawing (approximately midsemester), an undergraduate student may petition for withdrawal only for urgent, substantiated, nonacademic reasons. Nonmedical withdrawal by an undergraduate student on scholastic probation may affect the student's scholastic standing. Information about scholastic probation and dismissal is given later in this chapter.

A graduate student in good standing may withdraw with the approval of the graduate dean through the last class day of the semester. A graduate student who is in warning status may not withdraw without the recommendation of the graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean.

Withdrawal for military service. A student who withdraws as a result of being called to active military service may choose (1) to receive a refund of tuition and fees for the semester; (2) if eligible, to be assigned an incomplete (symbol X) in each course; or (3) at the instructor's discretion, to receive a final grade in courses where he or she has completed a substantial amount of coursework and has demonstrated sufficient mastery of the course material. Policies affecting students who are absent for military service but do not withdraw are given below.

Medical withdrawal. A medically ill student whose illness precludes class attendance may be withdrawn from the University as of the date and under the conditions specified at the time of the withdrawal. A student who requests medical withdrawal must submit adequate written documentation from the treating physician to the associate director for clinical services of University Health Services; under specified conditions, the associate director will instruct the registrar to withdraw the student.

Retroactive withdrawal. A student who wishes to leave the University for nonacademic reasons is expected to withdraw during the current semester as described above. Requests to withdraw after the semester is over are considered only if the student was somehow unable to withdraw. For example, students who were hospitalized or incarcerated, called away at the end of the semester because of a family crisis, asked to perform military service, or seriously debilitated by mental illness may be unable to withdraw during the semester in which they are enrolled.

In these cases, students may discuss the situation with the dean or an academic adviser in the dean's office. If there is sufficient and compelling documentation, and if the request for retroactive withdrawal is submitted to the dean's office during the next long-session semester, the dean or the dean's staff will review the request and consider approval of a retroactive withdrawal. Appropriate documentation could include written recommendations from University Health Services and the Counseling and Mental Health Center.

A college or school may approve an appeal for retroactive withdrawal for a semester long past, but only for the most compelling nonacademic reasons.

Attendance

Regular attendance at all class meetings is expected. Instructors are responsible for implementing attendance policy and must notify students of any special attendance requirements.

Special regulations of colleges and schools, required by the unique nature of their programs of study, may be enacted through the normal approval process. These special regulations may not conflict with University regulations on class attendance and absence.

Religious holy days. A student who misses classes or other required activities, including examinations, for the observance of a religious holy day should inform the instructor as far in advance of the absence as possible, so that arrangements can be made to complete an assignment within a reasonable time after the absence.

Absence for military service. In accordance with section 51.9111 of the Texas Education Code, a student is excused from attending classes or engaging in other required activities, including exams, if he or she is called to active military service of a reasonably brief duration. [10] The student will be allowed a reasonable time after the absence to complete assignments and take exams. Policies affecting students who withdraw from the University for military service are given above.

Examinations

The final examinations for each semester and summer term are scheduled by the registrar. Classes that meet at the same time during a semester also have a common examination time. An index of these examination times is included in the Course Schedule. Near the end of each semester and term, the complete examination schedule is distributed to academic offices and published in the Daily Texan; the examination schedule for a specific class is available through the registrar's Web site. Students may access their examination schedules through this site.

Examinations should begin promptly at the scheduled hour and should not continue beyond the three hours allocated in the official schedule.

No final examinations may be given before the examination period begins, and no change in time from that printed in the official schedule is permitted without approval. An instructor with a compelling reason to change the time of an examination must obtain the approval of the department chair and the dean of the college or school in which the course is taught before announcing an alternative examination procedure to the students. No substantial examinations may be given during the last class week or during the reading days and the no-class days preceding the final examination period. An examination is considered to be substantial if it counts for more than 30 percent of the final course grade. A change in the room assignment for a final examination may be made only with the approval of the registrar.

In accordance with University Policy Memorandum 3.201, the no-class days preceding final examinations are not to be used as dates on which papers are to be turned in, examinations are to be given, quizzes are to be scheduled, or for any other class-related activity, other than office hours. In addition, the final examination period is reserved for scheduled final examinations. No other class-related activity, with the exception of office hours, may be scheduled during the final examination period.

With the approval of the department chair, an instructor may choose not to give a final examination. However, if an examination is given, all students must take it and no exemptions may be allowed except pursuant to a uniform exemption policy announced to the class.

For good cause, an instructor may give a student permission to take an examination with a different class section than the one in which the student is registered.

For good cause, a student may petition his or her academic dean for permission to change the time or place of an examination from that specified in the official schedule. If permission is given by the dean and the instructor, no penalty (such as a reduction in grade) may be assessed.

In a course extending over two semesters, when the subject matter is continuous, the second-semester final examination may include the subject matter of the first semester.

A student may address complaints related to the final examination procedures in a course to the chair of the department or the dean of the college or school in which the course is offered, or to the Office of the Ombudsperson.

The following instructions govern the conduct of final examinations as well as other examinations given during the semester:

  • Students must be informed that all written work handed in by them is considered to be their own work, prepared without unauthorized assistance.
  • Students should be asked to cooperate in maintaining the integrity of examinations and encouraged to inform the instructor, without specifying the offenders, when cheating goes on in class.
  • Instructors are responsible for advising students of the rules governing examinations and for supervising examinations in their respective classes. They, or their representatives, must remain in the examination room and take necessary actions to ensure an orderly examination and minimize the temptations and opportunities for cheating.
  • Students are expected to (a) remain in the examination room until the test is completed; (b) refrain from talking; and (c) leave all notes and books where they are not accessible during the examination unless otherwise directed by the instructor.
  • An instructor who suspects academic dishonesty must report the case to the Office of the Dean of Students.

Searches

General searches of a student's personal papers and belongings may be conducted at the discretion of an instructor only when there is reasonable suspicion that the student has engaged in misconduct in violation of the rules on student discipline and conduct. In addition, the instructor must believe that the search is necessary to maintain the academic integrity of an examination or to maintain an environment in which learning can occur.

Availability of Classwork to Students

A student has the right to have all written materials that are submitted to meet the requirements of a course returned or made available for review. To be "made available" does not ensure the right to a photocopy, but the materials may be examined in the office of the faculty member or the academic department. Written materials that are not returned to the student must be retained by the faculty member or the department for at least one long-session semester following the completion of the course.

Reports

Semester reports from the registrar. Grade reports are available to all students, except students in the School of Law, at the end of each semester and summer session at the registrar's Web site. Printed grade reports are mailed to students who have had a change in scholastic status, have earned University Honors, or have requested a mailed copy before the end of the semester or summer session through the registrar's Web site. Grade reports are generally mailed to the student's permanent address on file in the Office of the Registrar; at the student's request or if the permanent address is outside the United States and its territories, reports are mailed to the local address.

Intrasemester reports from the deans. About the middle of each semester (but not in the summer session), faculty members report undergraduate students doing work below the passing grade of D to the deans, and the offices of the deans forward the reports to each student.

General Information, 2007-2008

page 2 of 4 in Chapter 4

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